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Discussion Starter #1
Want to get some advice for the purchase of equipment, how to buy, buying options, etc.

My stats:

5'10"
150 lbs
size 11 boot
boarding in Colorado

I have been boarding four times and enjoy the sport. The first three times were with lessons and had a Head Tribute 149 board (short for learning). My last trip was with a Burton LTR 155. I have enjoyed all of the times I have gone and enjoyed the boards that I have used. It is hard for me to compare the two boards since it was six weeks between the last two rides.

My goal is to have fun on the slopes. I don't figure that I will be doing the parks, but just enjoying the ride. I did go over the practice jump a couple of times on this last trip (OK 8" off the ground isn't anything to brag about), but don't figure that I will be involved with racing or lots of technical stuff.

I like easy. I would rather have a board that is easier to maneuver then one that lets me scream down the hill.

In the long run, I will probably go about 5 times a year.

Here are my questions:
Should I stay with a newbie board or more flexible board or see about something less flexible? I figure that my abilities will improve, should I count on that and plan for the future).

There are 1000's of boards out there. How does one really start to narrow down the board choices?

What are the best options for purchasing? I can get a new board, or a used board. I don't mind the idea of buying used rental equipment (if that is a good idea).

When are the best deals? I know that it is getting to the end of the season, but when do the sales really start? How about boards that are a few years old (new boards, old models)? There is something out here (SNIAGRAB) that is equipment sales, but what are the deals like?

Thank you all for you input.
 

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Should I stay with a newbie board or more flexible board or see about something less flexible? I figure that my abilities will improve, should I count on that and plan for the future).

There are 1000's of boards out there. How does one really start to narrow down the board choices?
You want to look for a board that best matches your weight, riding style, and skill level. A lot of websites have search filters for different categories like that, so just start plugging things in and reading around. Do your research!

What are the best options for purchasing? I can get a new board, or a used board. I don't mind the idea of buying used rental equipment (if that is a good idea).
The best deals are typically package deals (i.e. board, bindings, and boots all in one), but what's put together in a package might not be the best for you. A lot of people purchase online, but look around at boardshops near you to see if you can find a good deal too. Living in Colorado, I doubt you'll have trouble finding a boardshop.

When are the best deals? I know that it is getting to the end of the season, but when do the sales really start? How about boards that are a few years old (new boards, old models)? There is something out here (SNIAGRAB) that is equipment sales, but what are the deals like?
The best deals are now and over the next month or so. A lot of sites have had some awesome deals. Sierrasnowboard.com had a 50% off sale the other day that may still be going on. New boards, old models are fine. They might not have the "must-have, s**t-your-pants" brand-new technology in them, but they'll get the job done. Good thing is, they're typically cheaper too. From the looks of it, SNIAGRAB is just something run through the Sports Authority franchise. What I'd recommend is that you do your research, find what works for you, then see if it's on sale there. The problem with a lot of physical stores (as opposed to online retailers) is that you might feel compulsed to buy a tangible item on the spot that you think you may need. Be calm, be patient, do your research.
 

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I would definitely NOT buy a used rental board. I've neveer been to a place that rents out decent enough boards, maybe they exist, but all of the ones I've ever rented have been junk.

And it all depends on your budget and how serious you are. If you go 5 times a year, you don't need a top of the line board. If you can find a monster deal on a good used board that fits you, go for it, but now is also a pretty good time to buy new.

Narrowing down the board perfect for you....
1. figure out your price range, based on how much money you make and can justify spending.
2. Look into the future. As you get better what are your goals? Will you be going into the park more, or just going down hills. I's say for now, stay away from park boards that are too felxible. The type of riding you want to do should have the most impact on what kind of board you should get, I'm guessing an all-mountain board geared a little bit more toward free-riding.
3. Look at base materials, Sintered are generally better, but extruded are generally cheaper.
4. figure out what size will work best for you. Probably between 155-160.
5. Size 11 boot gets tricky, you may or may not need a wide board. But if you keep you feet at an angle you probably don't. Just don't get one that's too narrow.
6. You can also choose if you want a traditional camber or a rocker. Rocker is more popular now and probably better in powder and in the park, camber is generally better for carving. I hear rockers are easier to learn on but I'm skeptical.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
My total experience is with two different boards, with both being rentals. I have been on a Head Tribute 149 and a Burton LTR 155. It was 6 weeks between trips and I could not make a comparison between the two. I did enjoy the Burton, but also am getting much better. Is it a better board or a better boarder? Don't know.

I have figured out that I want a freeride to freestyle with rocker (easier to turn and stuff). I will not be going for the fast stuff nor doing much park stuff (that may change).

I do figure on going about 4-5 times a year and part of this is looking at the rental cost vs buying. If I spend $500 on a set-up, I could rent for 4-5 years for the same cost.
 

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I do figure on going about 4-5 times a year and part of this is looking at the rental cost vs buying. If I spend $500 on a set-up, I could rent for 4-5 years for the same cost.
For me, an probably most other riders, it's more about a more enjoyable overall experience than saving a few bucks after 4-5 years. You know what to expect with your own gear, your boots will be more comfortable, your board will be geared toward your own riding style, you don't have to wait in rental lines, etc. It takes a lot of the fun out of it when you have to borrow gear that sucks.
 

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I would suggest that you begin to first decide what style of riding you will be doing, more park, freestyle, all mt. etc. Once you establish that, most sites have some time of "board finder" eg. Burton, Ride, etc. This allows you to tell them your stats, male/female, how tall, what size boot, what type of riding. You put that all in, and it spits out the best board for you or a couple of choices. Try that out if you are looking to make a new purchase. I would also suggest reading up on the forums, reviews at places like sierrasnowboard.com and making a list of boards you like so you dont lose track. It can get very confusing!
 
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