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At minimum should the forward lean on your bindings contact the back of your boot when it's just resting flat in the binding? Or is it okay to have a gap between the top of your highback and your boots
 

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it's good to have a gap. gives you better flexibility.
 

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it's good to have a gap. gives you better flexibility.
This if you are more park oriented, but if you are looking for increased heel edge response on downhill, having them right up or close to the back of the boot will help.
 

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I truly underestimated the importance of forward lean. I find that if I am in the park, I ride with as little lean as possible. This allow more flexibility while riding on rail/boxes (flat base). If I am riding trees/mountain, put as much lean as comfortable. This make me more confident ripping blue and black diamond runs.

Note: If you find yourself busting you bottom on heel edge, increase the lean. Not knowing this information made be buy another snowboard, which I did not need. Hope this helps.
 

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It really depends on preference. Forward lean can help you edge a bit better on your heel side. However if you're not having any issues with heelside edging, you probably don't "need" any forward lean. Maybe it will help you. If you are park riding you can have a little forward lean, but probably none at all. If you feel like you're having issues doing heel edge carves quickly while free riding, increasing your forward lean can help that. It basically pushes the board back onto the heel edge sooner than if you had no forward lean, just making carving easier on your legs and maybe a bit more fluid. I've never ridden with any forward lean, even when free riding and I haven't had an issue with carving.

I'd advise playing around with it, as it's just a preference thing, and you may find that forward lean fits your riding style.
 

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Forgot one thing. Each binding has a certain amount of minimum forward lean. As an example I own two sets of Burton Cartel from 20010 (Standard) and 2011 (EST). My 2010 binding have a lot of minimum forward lean. For them to be exactly the same, my 2010 have to be at zero and my 2011 have to be at two. I think this was a result of people complaining about calf burn while riding (more forward lean = more burn). Hope this helps.
 

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Forgot one thing. Each binding has a certain amount of minimum forward lean. As an example I own two sets of Burton Cartel from 20010 (Standard) and 2011 (EST). My 2010 binding have a lot of minimum forward lean. For them to be exactly the same, my 2010 have to be at zero and my 2011 have to be at two. I think this was a result of people complaining about calf burn while riding (more forward lean = more burn). Hope this helps.
True, this is only something you need to adjust if you feel that you need it.

Edit: could also depend on forward lean of your boots too.
 

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I only ride with forward lean when I am in the pipe. I find that adding foward lean usually results in a lot of ankle bit (or is it calf bit?). But my legs hurt when I on the chair lift.

Plus I don't really like forward lean when doing jibbing either. But then agian, its just based on your personal preference.
 
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