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I am in the process of redesigning the snowboarding backpack for a day on the mountain. I'm a design student so I thought this is the perfect opportunity for me to take on a new challenge.
I have only been snowboarding for two years so I wanted to ask others that have more experience. Do you wear a backpack, if so which one? What are other backpacks lacking? What do you carry in your backpack? What features would you want in backpack? And anything else that you think would be useful.
 

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Yes, there are indeed rules to follow re this type of enquiry. TIP: I have found it's a good idea not to expect everyone to be open to new ideas in this industry unless it's a known brand.

Plenty available for the average person who just wants one on their back in an attempt to look cool, but perhaps something specifically designed for the backcountry enthusiast may find a market.

Good luck with it.
 

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Waterproof. Fleecelined goggle pocket. Back protector and backpanel access. Top handle. Ability to connect shoulder straps for onestrap mode. Hipbelt with pockets and large buckle. Separate bc-pocket with drainage and room for shovel/probe/poles/skins/crampons. Waterbottle compartment in the bottom that you can access without taking your pack off. Reflex bands. Snowboard carry. Durable fabric and zippers. Helmet carry on top at least.
 

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I've owned a dozen different backcountry ski/snowboard packs, but have yet to find one that includes everything I want in a pack.

For me, the perfect DAY TOURING pack will be 20-25 liters and hold:

shovel
probe
climbing skins
helmet
goggles
food/snacks
water
puffy jacket
spare warm mitts

The biggest problem I've found in backcountry ski/snowboard packs is there's too much internal pack space that needs to be filled in order for the pack to fit well. By locating the shovel BLADE on the exterior of the pack you can reduce the amount of internal space, which makes for a better fit. Dakine Heli 12 utilizes an external pack sleeve for the shovel blade. I think they're on the right track carrying this large bulky item on the exterior of the pack and not interfering with the organization of the internal space.

I also want: ONE snack pocket on the NON-PADDED hip belt, padded goggle pocket, tuckable helmet holder, breathable back padding and shoulder straps, and side compression straps that hold collapsable poles.

I'm less concerned with strapping a board on my pack and more concerned with a minimalist design, light weight materials, and well-fitting build.

Currently using a Jones DSCNT 25, and I HATE the fact that none of the zippers have metal tabs on them. All zippers are cord only, and require two hands to operate. Complete design flaw IMHO. I also have an Arcteryx Alpha FL 30 that I grab on those rare times when needing a little more capacity.

From a design and materials perspective, I think the Arcteryx SK 32 is one of the nicer packs on the market today.
 

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Forum rules, give us a video explaining your project or pound sand nerd.

2 years snowboarding suddenly feels they can redesign a backpack. You ever lugged 40lbs of camera gear, avalanche equipment, and food up the hill? No, then fuck off.
Someone needs a Snickers....

I think you really need to find your market within snowboarding. I've never gone backcountry but I always wear a backpack. The basics are maybe an extra layer, extra lens, and a snack/bladder. It needs to be very thin around the lower-back so it doesn't push you off the chairlift. Making sure it is tight is important too (chest and hip buckles!). Focus on anatomy.
 

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Someone needs a Snickers....

I think you really need to find your market within snowboarding. I've never gone backcountry but I always wear a backpack. The basics are maybe an extra layer, extra lens, and a snack/bladder. It needs to be very thin around the lower-back so it doesn't push you off the chairlift. Making sure it is tight is important too (chest and hip buckles!). Focus on anatomy.
I see you haven't been around here very long Grae. BA doesn't need a snickers, you need some time here. This forum gets posts like this almost as much as "which board should I get". The rules are clear and if either you or the OP had ever spent any time here you would know it is a solid rule.
 

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I see you haven't been around here very long Grae. BA doesn't need a snickers, you need some time here. This forum gets posts like this almost as much as "which board should I get". The rules are clear and if either you or the OP had ever spent any time here you would know it is a solid rule.
I'm not saying I disagree with the rule. It's a valid rule and makes total sense. Being rude to someone who shares your passion and wants to join your community does not. And just because there are lots of rude people, doesn't mean it's okay.

As a designer, rarely do you get the opportunity to design for yourself. It is your job to go out and talk to and understand your users. Asking them what it is they need in their tools. Very few of the people who design your gear are professionals at the sport. So if someone comes to you and says "I would like to make your life and experiences more enjoyable," it seems self destructive to tell them to fuck off. What if we give OP insights and inspiration so that when he graduates design school, he goes to work for Black Diamond/Arcteryx/Patagonia and works on the best pack that comes to market in 2024? I would rather be the one that helped him make my riding experience better, than be the one who told him to fuck off.
 

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Imo if you want to be part of a community, you need to learn to go along to get along, first.

As far as I'm concerned if somebody's first post is to ask for favors or trying to peddle their wares, they can go suck a duck.

If you honestly think the OP is here to contribute to the community or to make your life better, I have some of his prototypes to sell. Just wire transfer me $200 and I'll send you a back pack with all the features you want.
 

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I never thought the backpack needed to be redesigned. I bought mine off of Amazon (Teton Sports). and it fits my needs just fine. Not to bulky, so I can wear it under my jacket (as it keeps the hydration bladder from freezing and the especially the nipple). Enough room to stash my cheap cable lock and some snacks.

Usually a snowsport specific item, is justification to inflate the price..
 

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Someone needs a Snickers....

I think you really need to find your market within snowboarding. I've never gone backcountry but I always wear a backpack. The basics are maybe an extra layer, extra lens, and a snack/bladder. It needs to be very thin around the lower-back so it doesn't push you off the chairlift. Making sure it is tight is important too (chest and hip buckles!). Focus on anatomy.
Someone needs to sit down and shut the fuck up.

I'm not saying I disagree with the rule. It's a valid rule and makes total sense. Being rude to someone who shares your passion and wants to join your community does not. And just because there are lots of rude people, doesn't mean it's okay.

As a designer, rarely do you get the opportunity to design for yourself. It is your job to go out and talk to and understand your users. Asking them what it is they need in their tools. Very few of the people who design your gear are professionals at the sport. So if someone comes to you and says "I would like to make your life and experiences more enjoyable," it seems self destructive to tell them to fuck off. What if we give OP insights and inspiration so that when he graduates design school, he goes to work for Black Diamond/Arcteryx/Patagonia and works on the best pack that comes to market in 2024? I would rather be the one that helped him make my riding experience better, than be the one who told him to fuck off.
You clearly don't know shit about designers in the snowboard industry at all. Let me break it down for you, a lot of them are former regional riders who couldn't make it to the pro level and instead went to school and then through their connections as regional riders went on to be designers. They understand functionality better than anyone. How do I know this, because I work with them.

You want to talk passion, OK lets talk passion. I have a passion for people that work in design making the best functional products possible so people that snowboard can get the most out of their time and thus get to stoke their passion. I also understand that when someone has 1 post and never returns they didn't care, they just want to get an A on their project so they can be a good little boy and not revolutionize or at the slightest improve upon what has come before them. Then lets throw in the forum rules which if the OP really cared about they'd have followed or at the slightest understood. In this exact instance it's a one sided proposition for them with no benefit for anyone else. They follow the rules do what's asked you can believe they'll get a far better response. Harsh? Probably. But the world is a harsh place and coddling people isn't the answer.

So once again, sit down, shut up, and fuck off.
 
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