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Discussion Starter #1
Possibly a dumbass question, but I've never had to do this before and I couldn't find anything in the maintenance thread so...

My Hovercraft had an unfortunate incident with some racks in a closet in an RV while pottering round New Zealand, resulting in numerous scratches to the topsheet. Obviously this is just superficial and not really that big a deal but I'd still like to try "fix" or improve it all the same, especially as I had taken pride in keeping it in good shape until this incident managed to scratch it to be bits.

What can I do?




 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just to clarify, the day to day scratches don't bother me, like the big long one across the nose you can see. But it's a bit of a mess now with thousands of small cuts because of bouncing around in a tight space with metal edges...
 

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Have you actually tried that before?
I doubt he's tried it, only the most uptight of folks would bother fixing such minor cosmetic damage.

FWIW, my recommendation would've the same approach, start with a small area to test, dry sand the wetland 400 or600 the up to 1200. Then polish.

Maybe do a finish coat of urethane after.

My first recommendation would be just ride it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I doubt he's tried it, only the most uptight of folks would bother fixing such minor cosmetic damage.
Thank you. I mean, me clarifying that I realise it's not a big deal, it's just cosmetic and it's just personal preference really meant that I wanted you to call me uptight. And it's certainly such a big deal to spend a little figuring out if I can do something with it when I'm not riding it anyway that it's worth criticising. Very helpful, thanks. ;) :giggle:

FWIW, my recommendation would've the same approach, start with a small area to test, dry sand the wetland 400 or600 the up to 1200. Then polish.

Maybe do a finish coat of urethane after.

My first recommendation would be just ride it.
Hmmm. Maybe will try it so.





But honestly, seems more than I can be bothered with (despite being uptight, obviously). Figured there'd be a simpler and/or more tried and tested solution though -you know, like toothpaste in a scratched CD type thing.
 

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i would do a test with some marine varnish, or some other epoxy based varnish...never tried but it makes sense to me
 

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I've no idea if this is a suitable solution or not but I'll mention it anyway.

Rub a bit of olive or coconut oil in the scratches.

Last Christmas Eve in preparation to gift wrap my nephew's longboard, I accidentally gouged the clear coat grip while opening the shipping box with a blade. Panic let to quick thinking and I rubbed a bit of olive oil on the gouge. It completely disappeared. Well, blended to be unnoticeable. I figured the oil would help seal the area some, too.
 

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sanding it would be bad.

i like the cooking oil idea, but I think it could probably be improved for your situation.
 

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I suggest a surfboard repair kit... a light sand of the damaged area with the supplied sand paper from the kit then apply the fiberglass resin also supplied with kit let cure for at least 48 hours and bam all scratches be gone and will look like new again...

Something like this: Santa Cruz: Accessories: Epoxy Repair Kit
That repair kit will repair if you have a strip delaminating or a giant gouge or something, but it will not fix your cosmetic scratches UNLESS YOU ARE ALREADY PRACTICED AND PROFICIENT WORKING WITH FIBERGLASS AND ACTIVE RESIN.

I have alot of experience using this very kind of product (except in wholesale quantities) repairing surfboards. Making shit watertight is easy. Making it look good it a whole nother ball of wax. You put that shit on your snowboard and it will look worse and be heavier - forever.

I do agree with using the resin, its not a bad idea, it is the improvement I was suggesting on the oil technique. The problem with using resin is that there is no going back and requires some levels of skill and experience to not take a cosmetic situation and really fuck it up.
 

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That repair kit will repair if you have a strip delaminating or a giant gouge or something, but it will not fix your cosmetic scratches UNLESS YOU ARE ALREADY PRACTICED AND PROFICIENT WORKING WITH FIBERGLASS AND ACTIVE RESIN.

I have alot of experience using this very kind of product (except in wholesale quantities) repairing surfboards. Making shit watertight is easy. Making it look good it a whole nother ball of wax. You put that shit on your snowboard and it will look worse and be heavier - forever.
I shaped boards for Victoria Skimboards in Laguna Beach for a few years and Im not saying he needs to reglass the topsheet with the fiber cloth but only to ruff up the surface with the sand paper or sanding sponge supplied then apply a ultra thin layer of the epoxy to fill in the blemishes... In effect would be like a wet sand and adding a clear coat of paint to a custom paint job...

I do agree it takes some skill to accomplish this task and is not something to be rushed by any means so take your time the results are determined by the prep work and attention to detail... A clean work environment is also essential to pristine results and READ & RE-READ the instructions also wouldn't hurt to practice glassing some plywood bits until you get the feel of how it works before attempting the process on your board...

Lastly lesson learned get a bag to protect your board in the off season when in storage so things like this wont happen...

Or finally the most simple solution of them all buy some stickers you like and use em to cover up the ugly bits....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm very hesitant to sand it alright, and while resin and the surf kit sound like decent ideas I'm not too confident having zero experience. Might look in to the oil or perhaps the resin if I can't find a more reliable (as in take my skills out of the equation where possible!) solution

Dammit, I was sure there'd be some simple tried and test fix for this! :laugh:

Lastly lesson learned get a bag to protect your board in the off season when in storage so things like this wont happen...
Oh I have a bag. It wasn't the off season though, it was just tidied away on the road trip from one mountain to another. All I'll say is I didn't put it in there... :laugh:
 

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Dammit, I was sure there'd be some simple tried and test fix for this! :laugh:
I just edited my last post with the simple solution of stickers to cover up the ugly no skill required except make sure the top sheet is clean before applying them and roll them on slowly making sure to press out any bubbles along the way...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just edited my last post with the simple solution of stickers to cover up the ugly no skill required except make sure the top sheet is clean before applying them and roll them on slowly making sure to press out any bubbles along the way...
Nice idea, but I purposely kept that board free of stickers (and bought the prior season's model at that time) cos I love the wood finish.
 

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I've done lots of glas work too. He should practice on plywood first.

But really he should just ride it.
I agree but I do feel his pain the Hovercraft is a pretty board and unlike a jib stick that's meant to be beaten to shit Pow boards look pretty longer unless of course you pull a Sonny Bono thru the trees...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Don't want to keep repeating myself, but pointing out that I "should" just ride it is a but redundant.

I agree but I do feel his pain the Hovercraft is a pretty board and unlike a jib stick that's meant to be beaten to shit Pow boards look pretty longer unless of course you pull a Sonny Bono thru the trees...
Thank you, though I feel you are undermining it somewhat by calling it "pretty"... :lol:
 

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You have to remove the resin layer to the depth of the scratch and then polish it. I would start with 400 grit wet sand then 600 and then move to a gelcoat buffing compound and then a polish.
 
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Thank you, though I feel you are undermining it somewhat by calling it "pretty"... :lol:
I'm sorry I'm sorry its a badass manly man lumberjack looking board and is too badass to be covered with stickers... lol but it is the simple fix or you refine your skills working with epoxy resins and do it the hard way...

the oil would mask the problem areas but only until its washed away and would need to be reapplied much like a base coat wax... which gives me the idea of using a turtle wax rubbing compound or the like then following up with a paste wax polishing compound... but be careful with the rubbing compound as its also like a sandpaper and is an abrasive so take your time and be gentle just like you would with an auto paint job...
 
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