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Hi everyone,

Im another noob attracted by this particular post.. I've been hanging around for a while but decided to join up and start contributing.

I've been snowboarding for about 12 years, and for the vast majority of that time have been based in the UK so only make it out once a year really.. sometimes twice..

I have been riding a salomon fastback 163 for some time (I'm 6" tall and about 190lbs) but am finding it way too stiff to get anything more than a mini-Ollie out of it and don't feel like I am progressing.

I reckon the assassin would be a good replacement for me as it should give me a bit more flex for some jumping about, but still give me a good all-terrain board for those powder days and corduroy morning pistes..

What would you say?
 

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How about for replacing my Proto? I'm looking for something that will slay pow and be all mountain, a hair stiffer than the Proto. I'm totally off park it seems but I really like a centered stance twin that can float and butter yet be stable.

Is it damp at all? It doesn't need to be NS deaddamp but I enjoy some cushion for my older joints, don't like the bucked feeling.

point of reference: I would buy another Proto if they were the price of most other boards, but I'm just not in the market for a $600 deck that I'm going to destroy in 2 seasons.

I've avoided making my own thread for this until I'm actually ready to pull the trigger, but since I read this review, would love your thoughts.
Did you end up getting this board?
 

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Did you end up getting this board?
nope, planning to get something in the next couple months, but in a different financial spot so I may just go grab a proto at the mall. sounded like this is not the deck for me (OP) but am gonna take a hard look for/at the Greats (sounds like they are impossible to find anyway) first too.
 

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nope, planning to get something in the next couple months, but in a different financial spot so I may just go grab a proto at the mall. sounded like this is not the deck for me (OP) but am gonna take a hard look for/at the Greats (sounds like they are impossible to find anyway) first too.
I've got a 56 Greats I'm looking to sell, shoot me a PM if your interested.
 

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Hi everyone,

Im another noob attracted by this particular post.. I've been hanging around for a while but decided to join up and start contributing.

I've been snowboarding for about 12 years, and for the vast majority of that time have been based in the UK so only make it out once a year really.. sometimes twice..

I have been riding a salomon fastback 163 for some time (I'm 6" tall and about 190lbs) but am finding it way too stiff to get anything more than a mini-Ollie out of it and don't feel like I am progressing.

I reckon the assassin would be a good replacement for me as it should give me a bit more flex for some jumping about, but still give me a good all-terrain board for those powder days and corduroy morning pistes..

What would you say?
Wow nobody answered...
I think the Assassin would be perfect for what you described, ~159cm.
 

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How's the Assassin for charging? I want to be able to ride a board everywhere and do some jumps/tricks but worried about it being too soft for charging. How does the Assassin compare to Capita DOA? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
How's the Assassin for charging? I want to be able to ride a board everywhere and do some jumps/tricks but worried about it being too soft for charging. How does the Assassin compare to Capita DOA? Thanks.
A bit softer in the tips. If you're really into it for the speed, Man's Board.
 

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A bit softer in the tips. If you're really into it for the speed, Man's Board.
How does the mans board handle pow? I was looking at one the other day and it seemed pretty close to full camber. Trying to get down to a two board quiver this year and I'm still looking for a big mountain/pow board to pair with my Villain.
 

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How does the mans board handle pow? I was looking at one the other day and it seemed pretty close to full camber. Trying to get down to a two board quiver this year and I'm still looking for a big mountain/pow board to pair with my Villain.
Sick stick yo
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
To pair with a Villain and sticking with Salomon the Mans Board. Its just soft enough in the tips to be playful and as long as you dont have low angle terrain or dont ride too slow it'll float just fine in pow.

I totally missed that dudes post from March about an apparent lack of float in waist deep. Honestly, experience. I rode that in a 53 on my birthday at Steamboat for a sled trip, I weighed 160. It was waist deep and never really THAT steep. I did just fine. But ive been riding smallish park decks as everything boards for years. Hell I rode pow at Copper for SIA one year on a 151 Signal OG. Its mostly a speed thing and being able to keep the deck just above sinking to minimize the amount of effort spent to keep the nose up/tail down. If you and your friends were faster riders you wouldnt notice it as much. It'll come with time. But that said, if you're not spinning switch off pillows then the Assassin isnt ever going to be your best option in deep snow. Its twin. Something directionaly shaped will always be better.
 

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Yes, obviously riding style makes a difference and you can adjust to anything. Riding fast it wasn't really a problem, but after a 8 mile descent just tiring with the board needing more attention to stance and movements in pow.

Though if it's steep, you know how to handle a board and you're going fast, I imagine any deck would do. Therefore any board out there would, disregarding subjective elements, pass for the "good in pow" medal. Forget the few extreme cases..

Therefore for some people it would actually be more useful to hear comments from inexperienced riders doing comparisons than from those who know how to adjust. Too many of those "dood I'm so psyched for this brand, the riders, graphics and all the shit so I'm going to say this board fucking does it all!". You probably know what I mean. Not directed at anyone in particular, but just wanted to comment on the difficulties of getting an understanding from forum reading and not being able to try stuff yourself.

Anyway, going to spend 5 weeks in the alps this coming season. Will get to know the dynamics of the fluffy stuff even better... Maybe get those switch landings locked down!
 

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Just wanted to continue on my rant.

After a year of waiting I got to ride some pow for a few days in Cervinia, luckily. My friend was with me to whom I'd sold the Villain.

I had a mid wide 157 full camber Nitro Blacklight. That thing was really fast and surprisingly effortless in the powder. Might be the surface area being bigger and the slightly bigger set back. My friend complained about the Villain the same as I did though that it was a chore to do long lines on it. On the steeps there weren't any problems, but generally it was tiring.

For the sake of relativity and continued discussion, if the Villain is decent/good in pow, what kind of a board is so terrible that it couldn't be countered with almost any technique?

:blahblah:
 

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Its a pretty unfair comparison to compare the Nitro Blacklist vs the Villain.

The Villain is a true twin vs the directional twin of the Blacklist. Being directional, of course the Blacklist is going to better in POW.
 

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Yes, of course.

I haven't ridden a lot of twins (all mountain or park sticks) in powder, but I'm just intrigued what absolutely sucks since the Villain was so much effort relatively, even set back to a quite narrow stance.
 

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Because it's a stiff midwide board with a set back. This thing is built for Big Mountain, even if it lacks rocker. People rode camber in powder for decades priot to the rocker revolution.

The Salomon is a park board, that has rocker in the tips that make it a plus performer. You can set the bindings back all you want, but the board and sidecut were made to be centered. It's also soft, so the board will flex. That doesn't mean that someone conditioned to ride a soft centered board won't find it easy to ride in powder. You just aren't used to riding a softer twin board

Stiffer boards will also naturally want to ride faster, so it's easier to plane up with effort from your back foot
 

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Because it's a stiff midwide board with a set back. This thing is built for Big Mountain, even if it lacks rocker. People rode camber in powder for decades priot to the rocker revolution.

The Salomon is a park board, that has rocker in the tips that make it a plus performer. You can set the bindings back all you want, but the board and sidecut were made to be centered. It's also soft, so the board will flex. That doesn't mean that someone conditioned to ride a soft centered board won't find it easy to ride in powder. You just aren't used to riding a softer twin board

Stiffer boards will also naturally want to ride faster, so it's easier to plane up with effort from your back foot
Yeah. I'm beginning to think it's the stiffer tail that makes it easier to stomp down the backfoot where as the villain would give away... But that's been too long.

I guess we still seem to be missing the point. "Good in powder", relatively speaking, therefore applies to basically every board. What I was going after.
 

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Yeah. I'm beginning to think it's the stiffer tail that makes it easier to stomp down the backfoot where as the villain would give away... But that's been too long.

I guess we still seem to be missing the point. "Good in powder", relatively speaking, therefore applies to basically every board. What I was going after.
I think you are still missing what he is saying. Everything is relative. For a softer park board, the board is a plus performer in powder. And if you are used to riding softer park board (like Nivek), and take it everywhere like he does, this board will be a good performer in powder vs say a Rome Reverb full camber, which will suck in powder.

You are still off in your thinking. Big Mountain boards are ALWAYS going to handle better than park boards in the steep and deep because they are made to do that. Think about that. Stiff boards are made to go fast, which means you are riding powder fast, which means it takes less effort to plain up.

My question is, why would you take a Villain on big mountain lines expecting it to be great? Yes, it has a profile to plane in powder, but more like tree runs in a resort.

You missed the most important part, which was what the board is built to do. Even full cambers big mountain sticks are built for the backcountry. Plenty of pros are riding Custom Xs in the backcountry.
 

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I think you are still missing what he is saying. Everything is relative. For a softer park board, the board is a plus performer in powder. And if you are used to riding softer park board (like Nivek), and take it everywhere like he does, this board will be a good performer in powder vs say a Rome Reverb full camber, which will suck in powder.

You are still off in your thinking. Big Mountain boards are ALWAYS going to handle better than park boards in the steep and deep because they are made to do that. Think about that. Stiff boards are made to go fast, which means you are riding powder fast, which means it takes less effort to plain up.

My question is, why would you take a Villain on big mountain lines expecting it to be great? Yes, it has a profile to plane in powder, but more like tree runs in a resort.

You missed the most important part, which was what the board is built to do. Even full cambers big mountain sticks are built for the backcountry. Plenty of pros are riding Custom Xs in the backcountry.
Fair enough. I don't have nearly enough experience with soft/softish camber park boards in powder to make a claim. My perspective: the difference between the Villain and all the other boards I've ridden in powder is vast, but the difference between all the other boards has been very minimal, even riding the Blacklight switch. Talking about dick to nipple deep powder, not few inches of fresh.
Also, the problem wasn't really with speed, but simply trying to keep the nose from not sinking. Will have to give the Villain or a similar deck a go the next time I'm able to ride in such conditions.
 
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