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Ha .. well maybe not razor sharp. But super sharp:) I just wonder if it’s possible to have too sharp an edge like almost cut your finger sharp, does that make it catchy? and if that has any benefit over just sharp enough to take some nail off?
 

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Your edge is going to be around +/- 90° so the "Razor sharp" idea is not possible. Most boards done on a machine edge grind (factory etc) will be precise for this angle. I find with hand and base/side edge tools and diamond stones you'll get sharpness close but not as good as a machine. As you run the edge across the snow at speed it's going to cut into the ground and hold you on line. On ice the sharper the better but who likes riding that???
 

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You can have them ski race sharp with 5 different stones and stuff. It's just useless for snowboarding though. Best case scenario, your riding is no different than if tuned with a basic file. Worst case scenario, your board is bit too catchy which will have you ride conservatively (even if unconsciously). Maybe on WC ski racing slopes or super super icy slopes…
 

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You certainly don't need very sharp edges all the time, it's very much a preference thing...
Me personally, I always want the sharpest edges possible because I hate loosing grip. Your board can feel catchy though if you have a camber board. You can always defile the contact points a bit though...
 

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I’ve sliced gloves & fingers on a factory sharp edge. Sharp is sharp. If you can shave fingernail? You can cut skin.

Now,… How that relates to edge performance on snow and ice that’s a different question.
Three of my rides are at least five or six years from their last edge tune. Before the start of this season I’ll probably get the Proto and the Arbor roundhouse full camber which is my oldest board tuned up.
I think my Jones explorer is probably good for the season as it is

If I’m going to be riding ice? Nowadays, with having a few years riding under my belt, I would prefer a good sharp edge for grip. But then now, when I’m riding ice I actually use my edges,…Early on Ice scared the shit out of me and I was skidding all my turns anyways. 🤣🤷‍♂️

If you’re concerned about your edges, tune the board! if you don’t like it you can always take a file and undo it. 👍🏻
 

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Razor sharp is the only way I have mine, I usually sharpen them from the factory depending on what factory that is. Capita's or Endeavors I leave as is, but they get sharpened multiple times through the season. I've definitely cut gloves and fingers on them before when being careless. I like grip, it doesn't make them any more or less 'catchy' but when I tilt it on edge and pressure the board right I know it's going to hold.
 

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Essentially yes. But it depends lol. If you ride the whole mountain with power and speed and you're not worried about catching an edge but want maximum edge hold/control and speed. Then yes, you want them sharp. Although, expect less "razor" sharp with time. The more you ride it/have it tuned, the more metal you take away and the more the edge will fade. The only exception to this is if, A) you want the board to feel less catching, or, B) you primarily ride park and, again, want the board to be less catching (i.e., more buttery, easier to initiate turn/ spin, more forgiving on landings from a spin, etc...). If either is the case, keep it sharp from contact to contact and then detune the edge at the contact points with a detuning (idk the true name) stone. My Dakine kit came with one and I use it to take the contact point edge off my park boards. Hope this helps. Happy trails!
 

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Anyone else de tune the tip and tail? I thought it is pretty normal to sharpen the complete edge then take a stone and "unsharpen" the edges by the tip and tail...
I round off the actual tip and tail (outside the contact points) and then use a gummy stone to 'blend' maybe 1-2 inches at the actual contact points. So my contact points are sharp, but not as razor sharp as the other 95% of my effective edge.
 
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Anyone else de tune the tip and tail? I thought it is pretty normal to sharpen the complete edge then take a stone and "unsharpen" the edges by the tip and tail...
Yep, If you're riding full camber I have crisp edge along entire EE length. I polish around the tips mainly for the aesthetics but not too worried about the crispness in this area. I'm fortunate to have a decent quiver so can jump around different profiles best suited to conditions. If you're rounding off edges on full camber I feel you may better be served jumping back to a pure pop style profile. Personally I'm not the type of rider always sending it into shitty hazardous and rocky terrain that will destroy the edges. Always searching for the perfect path to drop. However I have a few people bring me in their boards to service with their edges looking like a rough bread knife everytime they return. Maybe park/freestyle riders?
 

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Anyone else de tune the tip and tail? I thought it is pretty normal to sharpen the complete edge then take a stone and "unsharpen" the edges by the tip and tail...
Never. I ride camber boards and I like having the entire contact length equally sharp.

I suspect the whole "detune" thing is to reduce the risk of novices catching the tip and maybe locking in the tail, but perhaps it's all just a hold over from old skool ski lore.

It's worth checking the actual base bevel and side edge angle, and making sure that whatever you do use is correct, or make sure that you trust the people working on it for you. They're not all the same, and getting it wrong probably isn't a good idea.
 

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I suspect the whole "detune" thing is to reduce the risk of novices catching the tip and maybe locking in the tail, but perhaps it's all just a hold over from old skool ski lore.
I just don't like how my board drives into the turn when the contact points are as sharp as the rest, especially on camber boards. I always found a bit of "gradient" near the tips gives much more precision. Now we're speaking of a couple light pass of a gummy (plus the one to remove burrs), not jib style grinding.
 

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I round off the actual tip and tail (outside the contact points) and then use a gummy stone to 'blend' maybe 1-2 inches at the actual contact points. So my contact points are sharp, but not as razor sharp as the other 95% of my effective edge.
Pretty much exactly what I did when riding resorts.

Yep, If you're riding full camber I have crisp edge along entire EE length. I polish around the tips mainly for the aesthetics but not too worried about the crispness in this area. I'm fortunate to have a decent quiver so can jump around different profiles best suited to conditions. If you're rounding off edges on full camber I feel you may better be served jumping back to a pure pop style profile. Personally I'm not the type of rider always sending it into shitty hazardous and rocky terrain that will destroy the edges. Always searching for the perfect path to drop. However I have a few people bring me in their boards to service with their edges looking like a rough bread knife everytime they return. Maybe park/freestyle riders?
Low tide board for early or late season? I have been unlucky in the back country and chewed up some edges on rocks and stumps under just inches of snow, when I thought it would be feet.

Never. I ride camber boards and I like having the entire contact length equally sharp.

I suspect the whole "detune" thing is to reduce the risk of novices catching the tip and maybe locking in the tail, but perhaps it's all just a hold over from old skool ski lore.

It's worth checking the actual base bevel and side edge angle, and making sure that whatever you do use is correct, or make sure that you trust the people working on it for you. They're not all the same, and getting it wrong probably isn't a good idea.
It wouldn't surprise me at all if it was old skool ski lore!

So end of the day, like most questions asked, depends on snow conditions, board profile, skill level and style of riding. I clean and wax my boards religiously but rarely sharpen the edges.
 
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