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I am a runner with a history of tight IT bands in my legs but I can usually manage it with stretches and sports massages. However I just got offered ski season work in Italy and thought I would learn to board as its easier on the knees that skiing. However after a couple of sessions its flaring up and my knees are stiff, is this normal and will it help strengthen the muscles or should I just give up now? :unsure:
Thanks
 

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Get out there and ride. Stay within your ability, and progress slowly. Stretch a lot, talk to a PT, and carry on.
 

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only you can answer how important it is to you, that you you even started this thread says, 'kinda,sorta'
 

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I am a runner with a history of tight IT bands in my legs but I can usually manage it with stretches and sports massages. However I just got offered ski season work in Italy and thought I would learn to board as its easier on the knees that skiing. However after a couple of sessions its flaring up and my knees are stiff, is this normal and will it help strengthen the muscles or should I just give up now? :unsure:
Thanks
SNOWBOARD! Two true stories:

#1) My wife took up skiing after being left alone half the time as I was on the mountain riding...she considered snowboarding with me, but chose skiing after her doctor told her skiing would make her existing back problems much worse. He agreed snowboarding was easier on the knees, but the learning phase, and the tough falls, could ruin her back forever, then she wouldn't be able to do anything.

#2) I took up snowboarding nearly 14 years ago and still put in a modest 20-30 days a season. Not bad for an older guy. I also play beach volleyball. I was off the mountain for the entire 2011 season after some serious foot surgery on my right metatarsal tendon and chips/bone on bone in my ankle. I was told the surgery had an 85% success rate. After 2 weeks of immobility and bed, six weeks in a cast, four weeks in a soft cast and ten weeks of PT, it was determined that I was in the unlucky 15% -- my surgery basically failed.

So now walking is still painful, but I can play some limited volleyball if I wear lots of braces, take some pain killers and don't push it. But you know what? I can still snowboard all day! I wear stiff freeride boots (ThirtyTwo Focus Boas) on a stiff board (NS Titan). The thing is, the stiff boots act like a cast and hold the foot/ankle in place when tightened properly. I literally can't stand or walk for too long without serious pain. I was laid off after my surgery because I was out for so long and cost my company lots of money, and haven't found a FT job yet, because of my foot. I could try to claim Disability, but the thing is -- I CAN STILL SNOWBOARD! No one will understand that walking hurts, standing hurts, but snowboarding feels GOOD. It really does. The exhilaration, feeling I'm doing something. Does my foot hurt at the end of the day? Sometimes, but nothing like it does after a one-hour walk through a fucking mall.

I'm still eaking by doing freelance work, nothing like the money I was making before. Not sure I'll get another 30 days in this year unless a good gig comes through...but it's better than claiming Disability and sitting at home collecting a check but not being able to do what I love. Those bastards WILL send spies to watch you, to make sure you're really disabled. I know this for a fact, I knew a private detective who did this for a living. It's not worth it...I'd rather be on the mountain.

I guess it's all about priorities. Sorry for the long rant. Best of luck with your recovery.
 

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I am a runner with a history of tight IT bands in my legs but I can usually manage it with stretches and sports massages. However I just got offered ski season work in Italy and thought I would learn to board as its easier on the knees that skiing. However after a couple of sessions its flaring up and my knees are stiff, is this normal and will it help strengthen the muscles or should I just give up now? :unsure:
Thanks
I never even knew what an IT band was until a steep session in Tahoe, when my technique was still spotty. I was fighting the steepness with over exaggerated movements (I felt I was leaning too far forward) and after just one run my left knee felt like rubber.

It immediately felt better when I stopped the run. I had tried a new stance width and blamed it on that. I switched back and rode the rest of the day with not much pain, and the next day with zero issues.

A few months later I went to Bangkok and my wife and I had to go about 5 miles in 20 minutes on foot to catch dinner with my family (tour bus, no phones, leaving after dinner so it was urgent). On the walk back that same area acted up big time. To the point I couldn't even walk down a flight of stairs. As soon as I rested, it was fine. But snow season was starting and I was worried because it would nag here and there leading up to the winter. So I googled it, and it was indeed an IT band issue. Never even heard of it.

I'll cut the story short since I tend to ramble. That season went without a hitch mostly, because I learned better technique esp. on the steeper stuff. Instead of fighting the steepness with exaggerated board movements I know just go with it and it's so much easier on the legs and knees.

Fatigue is usually a function of not being in shape obviously, but also improper technique in my opinion. I made great strides this past year in battling uncomfortable steeps and now I get stoked more than intimidated.

The problem is, you need to get from where you are now, to that point. Extensive lessons (I have taken none) might get you there.
 

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I wouldn't give up snowboarding unless I couldn't stand anymore. Consult a therapist and find a solution. Don't just give up!
This is essentially what my surgeon told me after the failed surgery...we could re-try, with still no guarantee off success, or I could just determine how important snowboarding was to me, and what level of pain I could endure.


So far, after just one full season back on the mountain, my feeling is that the time with friends, the fun, the rush, far outweighs the amount of pain I put up with. I have to rest more often, some days I have to quit before last chair...but it's far better than NOT snowboarding at all.
 

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A few months later I went to Bangkok and my wife and I had to go about 5 miles in 20 minutes on foot to catch dinner...
Pretty funny! Thailand did me in, too. Not Bangkok, because the Red Shirt were doing their revolution thing at the time, the military shooting people in the streets. Consulate advised tourists stay away. So we stayed on the islands, Samui, Phagnan, Tao. This was early April, I had only been off the mountain for a couple of weeks. Walking on the soft sand beaches for two weeks did me in. I'd walk a few hundred yards in the sand and my tendon and ankle would be screaming in pain. Good thing there was a lot of diving and lounging (and drinking). We came home, tried to get back to a normal summer, but by this time I could hardly walk.

Fuckin' Thailand!
 

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As a cycling coach, I've had many athletes plagued by tight IT bands due to its linear motion (myself included) Get a foam roller and bring it with you. Use it every other day to start out and then you will eventually get down to 2x per week. You can google "IT band foam roller" for some video instruction.
I use the black ones which are not as soft as the white ones, while more painful at the start.
You will outgrow the soft white ones quickly through regular use.
 

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Pretty funny! Thailand did me in, too. Not Bangkok, because the Red Shirt were doing their revolution thing at the time, the military shooting people in the streets. Consulate advised tourists stay away. So we stayed on the islands, Samui, Phagnan, Tao. This was early April, I had only been off the mountain for a couple of weeks. Walking on the soft sand beaches for two weeks did me in. I'd walk a few hundred yards in the sand and my tendon and ankle would be screaming in pain. Good thing there was a lot of diving and lounging (and drinking). We came home, tried to get back to a normal summer, but by this time I could hardly walk.

Fuckin' Thailand!
As far as Thailand knee injuries go, ours are pretty tame!

Last time I went there we did Phuket and Phi Phi. This time we did Bangkok and Pattaya. Pattaya is where all the Bangcockians go when they went sin. So you can imagine what a sideshow that place was!!!
 

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Get a foam roller and bring it with you.
This works for me. I don't have major issues though, so for the occasional tight IT band issue I use the white roller after a day on the slopes. I need to get into the habit of rolling BEFORE heading out though.

BTW, I had lower foot pain as a result of a work accident last fall, and rolling my foot on a ball just before putting my boots on at the bottom of the hill worked wonders! :yahoo:
 

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As far as Thailand knee injuries go, ours are pretty tame!

Last time I went there we did Phuket and Phi Phi. This time we did Bangkok and Pattaya. Pattaya is where all the Bangcockians go when they went sin. So you can imagine what a sideshow that place was!!!
I've heard many stories about Pattaya. We were on Samui for Songkran -- it was epic! But as tempted as we were, we skipped the Ladyboy Cabarets. Because of the Red Shirts, we got only one night on the mainland, but no regrets. The islands are absolute paradise! We'll hit up Bangkok on the next trip... and I'll wear a brace. :D
 

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This works for me. I don't have major issues though, so for the occasional tight IT band issue I use the white roller after a day on the slopes. I need to get into the habit of rolling BEFORE heading out though.

BTW, I had lower foot pain as a result of a work accident last fall, and rolling my foot on a ball just before putting my boots on at the bottom of the hill worked wonders! :yahoo:
I've seen so many different techniques and videos. Do you guys have any specific ones you like for the foam rolling?



I've heard many stories about Pattaya. We were on Samui for Songkran -- it was epic! But as tempted as we were, we skipped the Ladyboy Cabarets. Because of the Red Shirts, we got only one night on the mainland, but no regrets. The islands are absolute paradise! We'll hit up Bangkok on the next trip... and I'll wear a brace. :D
Just make sure you don't yourself stuck in any situation where you need knee pads. Like the infamous quote in Hangover 2, there is a reason they don't call it BangCunt!
 

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I agree about the foam rolling. If only I found it 20 years ago!

Get the high density (black) foam roller, enjoy the pain initially, then about 2 weeks later go "hey, this doesn't hurt anymore!"


And rejoice.

Tis good!
 

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I have hyperextended my left knee several times in my life, and injured my ACL and other ligaments, causing my left knee to be weak and prone to popping out of joint. I was told by a friend (who is also an Orthopedic physicians assistant) to use a knee brace called a "POD MX" which is marketed mainly toward Motocross riders. There is an MX300 and MX700 and both a pretty pricey ($500-700 a pair), but they almost completely stabilize my knee and keep it from hyperextending or twisting. These braces feel like body armor, but they work! They also protect my knees from impacts.

If you can afford them, BUY them if you have weak or injured knees.
 

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Optimize your stance for less knee strain

I would definitely try and figure out what stance works best for your knees. You might experiment with widening or narrowing your stance.

More importantly, maybe, is the angle that your feet are at on your snowboard. The slighter the angle the better, in terms of your knees.

But yeah, stretch lots before your boarding sesh. And it sounds like you're still pretty new to the sport, so give it some time. But definitely do not underestimate what changing your stance and feet angles can do for your stiff knees.
 

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There is a lot if toe and heel work involved with snowboarding and it looks like it IT is in the calf so it might be stressful on an injury like that. I would try it and see how comfortable it is.
 

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If you're going to foam roll for ITB syndrome make sure you're going all the way up to your ilium to hit TFL and glute med. Most people stop and try to beatup the tendon and it just takes longer to get results. Also dont' forget the lateral rectus junction, that's going to be the most painful but one of the most important.
 
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