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Hi, I'm pretty much a beginner, I did my first week snowboarding 2 years ago in the Czech republic, for a week, and a year ago in Austria, also for a week.

In those two times, I noticed a problem with my side slipping.
After doing side slipping for a few minutes(when encountering a too steep of a hill for me) the mussels surrounding my ankle, and above that, really hurts. It hurts to an extend that I can't keep on doing side slipping. So, the way I see it, the problem should be one of the following:


  • Something's wrong with my technique
    My mussels around the ankle and above a re really week
    Side slipping in steep hills/icy hills was not meant to be done for more than a few minutes/dozens of meters...

What do you think?

Thanks:)
 

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probably all three. it's not gonna be extremely comfortable and natural, but not painful enough to make you want to stop, which is why i'm assuming it could just be lack of muscle in your calf and legs.
 

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it sounds like your heels may have lifted as you were carving down the mountian, especially on the steeps. when your heel lifts, it really, really hurts your feet all over. to fix this: you can buy or rent a smaller size of boot.
 

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perhaps ur using your muscles instead of understanding how to use the leverage generated by your bindings and joints and boots...which is generally noted to bend your knees more

and btw....side slipping is generally to be avoided

lessons are well worth the expense
 

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it sounds like your heels may have lifted as you were carving down the mountian, especially on the steeps. when your heel lifts, it really, really hurts your feet all over. to fix this: you can buy or rent a smaller size of boot.
JFC, just when we all try to be civil and lenient with you, you post this utter horse shit...

The OP‘s problem is heel side, not toe side!!!
 

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A few thoughts.

1. Take a lesson it's worth it
2. Muscle endurance and strength for those specific muscles will take a little time to build
3. Holding a specific edge for too long will make almost anyone cramp up
4. Being on a run that is to steep for your skill level will make you nervous causing you to use more muscles and strength then necessary.
5. Take a lesson

Like previously stated. Forward lean could help you use less muscle, bend your knees, take a lesson.
Oh and watch some YouTube videos "learn to snowboard"

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the answers...

Regarding my technique (or the lack of it...) - When I'm doing the side slipping, I'm greatly using my foot, by lifting the foot front and toes, so the ankle will be pushed against the mountain, and I'm not using other parts of the leg that much, is it a bad way to do it?

The pain I'm feeling is in the front of my leg,above the ankle, and below the shin.

Next time I'll be on a snowboard vacation, I'll ask the instructor to give me pointers on that one, cause it seems that my technique is flawed some how.
 

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Regarding my technique (or the lack of it...) - When I'm doing the side slipping, I'm greatly using my foot, by lifting the foot front and toes, so the ankle will be pushed against the mountain, and I'm not using other parts of the leg that much, is it a bad way to do it?

The pain I'm feeling is in the front of my leg,above the ankle, and below the shin.

Next time I'll be on a snowboard vacation, I'll ask the instructor to give me pointers on that one, cause it seems that my technique is flawed some how.
The two other replies stating forward lean on your bindings and leverage. They go hand and hand. Forward lean is when you adjust the high back forward towards the toe edge. Using the high back of your binding for leverage to lift the toe edge up rather then your ankles. So basically you use you legs not feet to lift the egde by leaning against the high back which gives you leverage
 

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I will echo the lesson and forward lean suggestions. Basically you want your weight song the work so squat down and this will move your mass over the heel edge which will engage it instead of trying to do it all with your feet/ankles.
 

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The problem here is your technique, aka that your side slipping in the first place. Learn how to carve on less steep runs and work your way up to blacks and double blacks. And pick your run before hand so your not side slipping over blacks and pushing snow piles that could endanger someone going fast. Also good that your going with an instructor, they will help you quite a bit in the beginning stages of your riding.
 

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The problem here is your technique, aka that your side slipping in the first place. Learn how to carve on less steep runs and work your way up to blacks and double blacks. And pick your run before hand so your not side slipping over blacks and pushing snow piles that could endanger someone going fast. Also good that your going with an instructor, they will help you quite a bit in the beginning stages of your riding.
:thumbsup:

yea no reason to get better at side slipping.

Even with advanced techniques the way we apply pressure to the heel edge is going to make it physically perform a bit different from toe side which requires finer muscle memory from the ankles all the way through the hips and shoulder for balance.

You are experiencing this same difference in physics without any of the advantages of knowing how to ride. Accept that heel side slide slipping is never going to give you the confidence you are looking for, instead learn to advance down the fall line (this will break you of the fear that is keeping you in falling leaf techniques) and brake using either edge.
 

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Hi, I'm pretty much a beginner, I did my first week snowboarding 2 years ago in the Czech republic, for a week, and a year ago in Austria, also for a week.

In those two times, I noticed a problem with my side slipping.
After doing side slipping for a few minutes(when encountering a too steep of a hill for me) the mussels surrounding my ankle, and above that, really hurts. It hurts to an extend that I can't keep on doing side slipping. So, the way I see it, the problem should be one of the following:


  • Something's wrong with my technique
    My mussels around the ankle and above a re really week
    Side slipping in steep hills/icy hills was not meant to be done for more than a few minutes/dozens of meters...

What do you think?

Thanks:)
Is it only one ankle? What is the pain like? stabbing or a dull pain? Although technique will improve your riding. It sounds a lot more like you had a previous ankle injury.
 

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Regarding my technique (or the lack of it...) - When I'm doing the side slipping, I'm greatly using my foot, by lifting the foot front and toes
Basically you want your weight song the work so squat down and this will move your mass over the heel edge which will engage it instead of trying to do it all with your feet/ankles.
This is the correct way to side slip on your heels, you want to get in a squat position so that all of your weight is over your heel edge, as oppose to trying to lift up your toes.
 

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Hi, I'm pretty much a beginner, I did my first week snowboarding 2 years ago in the Czech republic, for a week, and a year ago in Austria, also for a week.

In those two times, I noticed a problem with my side slipping.
After doing side slipping for a few minutes(when encountering a too steep of a hill for me) the mussels surrounding my ankle, and above that, really hurts. It hurts to an extend that I can't keep on doing side slipping. So, the way I see it, the problem should be one of the following:


  • Something's wrong with my technique
    My mussels around the ankle and above a re really week
    Side slipping in steep hills/icy hills was not meant to be done for more than a few minutes/dozens of meters...

What do you think?

Thanks:)
That's your answer in bold. Get back onto hills you are comfortable with and don't side slip unless in an emergency (it happens).

When you side slip you're fighting gravity. Well gravity wins. As you get better, you'll learn to traverse steeper hills. There are a few different ways. I used to just turn quickly and go to one side, pause, then turn quickly (you can hop but I'm not sure that's recommended/correct) to face the other way and then go to the other side, etc etc. Now I'm pretty much comfortable with all but the steepest of the steeps but that's how I used to do it.

It's just skill/comfort.
 

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as everyone stated, get a class. If you cannot afford just watch some vids(I did) about J-turns or garland turns and practice them on a less steeper hills. side slipping has there place in boarding but its frowned upon by skiers:laugh:
goodluck and enjoy your riding this season.
 

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If you absolutely have to sideslip, slip heelside and then switch to toeside, and back and forth. It's hard to commit at first because it feels like you're going to die. But once you get used to the feeling, you'll come to like it. And if you keep switching back and forth eventually you'll discover you're turning all the time, and you don't need to slip anymore. But what helped me was riding on greens and practicing constantly turning to get a better feel.
 

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Hey Yeti. The pain you are experimenting is your like many says your muscles not being used to it, your highbacks could be a bit too stiff for you as a beginner (the big plastic things sticking out of your bindings to support the back of your lower leg) and your muscles around your lower leg tightening up. Call them shinsplints if you will one can get same stuff when you start running a lot.

So quick fix is like others said get lessons to learn to curve and slow down on your toes as well when needed, do runs that aren't so steep that you need to break hard and massage your calfs and shins.

Have fun out there and report back if you are getting rid of this problem :)
 
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