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I Recently spent a week in Crested Butte, CO and rented boards for the week. The last few days I did the demo rental package and rode a 160 cm Rossi onemagtek and a 159 cm Rossi angus. I really liked them both but conditions were super snowy so I feel like I didn't get to really test them and see how well the board fit with me. I'm 6'4 and 200, I wear size 13 boots. I've seen online that with my
Size shoe I should be riding wide boards and I've noticed that rossignol only makes midwide as their widest size. Would size 13 to be big for a board that width? Im not sure if I should look to other brands that make wider boards for my next purchase. Any help would be awesome.

Thanks
 

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I'm also a size 13 and ride wide boards. I haven't tried any mid-wide boards, but the only thing you should look for is toe and heel drag. If you're set up in a mid-wide board and you're hanging over, you should go wider.
 

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It doesn't matter what they call it, it just matters how wide it is. Look at burton wides and they will probably be thinner then the rossi midwides. If you can find out what the width is at the binding inserts that is the best info.
 

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I'm also a size 13 and ride wide boards. I haven't tried any mid-wide boards, but the only thing you should look for is toe and heel drag. If you're set up in a mid-wide board and you're hanging over, you should go wider.
No overhang will actually make the board more difficult to turn. You want a little bit of overhang (more on toes) to have the easiest turn initiation. More than 1-1.5 inches of toe overhang can cause issues during hard carving. You really don't want more than 0.5 inches on the heel.

Think about where the most pressure is when you stand on your toes. Is is right at the end of your big toe? No. It is at the ball of your foot, the big padded knuckle of your big toe. The closer you can get that spot to the edge of the board (about an inch behind the tip of your boot), the better turn initiation you will have and you will have better/quicker/finer motor control over the board.
 

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If you are happy with skidded turns and mellow carves (not tilting the board very much), you can get away with quite a bit of overhang.

I start noticing overhang issues with more than 2cm overhang (my boots are centered, that's 2cm for toes/heels each); e.g. boots dragging in soft chop that the board itself cuts through, the board edge getting knocked out while carving when it gets slightly choppy, the boots dragging in powder that has set for a bit or has a soft crust.

With size 14 (and very compact boots), I currently ride a board with 28.6cm waist and another one with 28cm waist.

No overhang will actually make the board more difficult to turn.
At size 13 he wont be having no overhang, even with the widest board he can find.
 

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I have size 13 boots as well (most of them I have used have some sort of footprint reducing tech) The smallest WW I can get away with is 260mm Anything smaller I wind up having significant overhang issues. I comfortable ride 265 +/- 2mm. I think the rossi boards have a WW of 26.1 or so, which should be ok for you.
 

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larger boot size can be mitigated with a greater angle on the binding....the idea that any toe drag is better for turn initiation, contro.l or especially carving, is imo, completely bogus...toe drag fouls a proper carve, and if you have to initiate turns with a dragging toe, there is a problem.
 

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larger boot size can be mitigated with a greater angle on the binding....the idea that any toe drag is better for turn initiation, contro.l or especially carving, is imo, completely bogus...toe drag fouls a proper carve, and if you have to initiate turns with a dragging toe, there is a problem.
Wrong. To see it for yourself, simply strap your boots into the bindings without wearing them and then tilt the board onto its edge until the boots touch the ground. Drag is only an issue if you are regularly riding with more board inclination than this angle.
 

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i didnt mean highback angle...that was the wrong term, sorry..meant rotational angle setting, +25/+-12 for example

if you are saying that some toe drag is ok for carving, than we will have to agree to disagree
 

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i didnt mean highback angle...that was the wrong term, sorry..meant rotational angle setting, +25/+-12 for example

if you are saying that some toe drag is ok for carving, than we will have to agree to disagree
No, I am not talking about highback angle/forward lean. My point is that overhang (toe or heel) does not necessarily imply drag. Rather it takes considerable overhang and board angle/inclination before there is drag - as illustrated by the test that I suggested.
 

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gotcha hktrdr, ok...when you get up to size 13 (which i am), you can easily get to 'considerable' on anyhting less than a W board...i dont know what therossy mid-wide thing is, need to see actual numbers...if he was a 11-12 there might be a bit of a grey area...but

going back to the OP, i'm just going so say my opinion (imo)

I Recently spent a week in Crested Butte, CO and rented boards for the week. The last few days I did the demo rental package and rode a 160 cm Rossi onemagtek and a 159 cm Rossi angus. I really liked them both but conditions were super snowy so I feel like I didn't get to really test them and see how well the board fit with me. I'm 6'4 and 200, I wear size 13 boots. I've seen online that with my
Size shoe I should be riding wide boards and I've noticed that rossignol only makes midwide as their widest size. Would size 13 to be big for a board that width? Im not sure if I should look to other brands that make wider boards for my next purchase. Any help would be awesome.

Thanks
i'm a 13 also, and have dealt with all this stuff for many years, not saying it's the black and white correct answer, but its an informed opinion:

find boots with the shortest size 13 profile you can, i love my 32Primes, but whatever works and are comfy, etc

find a wide board you like (dont know about the mid-wide as i said, its the numbers that count), ignore any stigma against wide board, esp. since you are just getting going, find a foot angle and binding position that is workable and minimizes the drag (on a W you can easily have zero drag in 13's, imo that is what you want)

learn how to carve that thing, and forget the rest.
 

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i didnt mean highback angle...that was the wrong term, sorry..meant rotational angle setting, +25/+-12 for example

if you are saying that some toe drag is ok for carving, than we will have to agree to disagree
As stated below, overhang does not equal drag. I think it is really important to get past this "minimizing drag" thing, and realize that the angles required for drag are substantial and most people take it too far when looking at reducing the amount of overhang. There are stigmas against wide boards for a reason, because many people think they need a wider board so there is NO overhang and that is simply not true. They end up getting a wider board than they actually need and the board is slow edge to edge and can be a bitch to turn, ESPECIALLY for a beginner. It is correct to look at the numbers, but it is also important to realize that an inch of overhang will never be a problem for anyone but the most skilled and precise carvers on steep terrain. A small amount of overhang places the areas of maximum foot pressure (ball of foot) directly over the edge or closer to it, thus increasing fine control and reducing the amount of pressure needed to get a particular result (turning.) If you cannot achieve this small amount of toe overhang in a situation where the board is too wide or the edges are at the very tips of the boot, you want to adjust the baseplate to move the binding closer to the toe and then add some highback lean. Moving your binding closer to the toe moves the ball of your foot closer to the edge, increasing toe edge control. You WILL have reduced feel/control on your heel edge by moving your heel further from the edge, so you want to increase highback lean to increase the ease and lessen the effort to get the board up on the heel edge.

I do the above when instructing, when beginners complain that it is hard to turn on to their toe side. I have ALWAYS seen an improvement after doing this binding adjustment and am usually met with very excited comments about how a simple binding alteration made snowboarding "so much easier."

For the OP, if you get a size 13 boot with shrinkage tech, you shouldn't really need to look at any board over a 26.3 ish cm waist.

No, I am not talking about highback angle/forward lean. My point is that overhang (toe or heel) does not necessarily imply drag. Rather it takes considerable overhang and board angle/inclination before there is drag - as illustrated by the test that I suggested.
 

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my opinion is that a beginner should start on the board that they most likely will be riding for their riding career, and get used to it from the getgo. and if you are 6'4, 200 and 13, it is mostly going to be a W

i also think the 'slow' edge to edge comment on a W, is also bogus...it comes down to the rider, and experience of course... this is the real (unreal) stigma against wides, not overhang/drag issue

just opinions from and opinionated person, haha...final opinion

good luck oprime824!
 

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The slow edge to edge comment is absolutely true. Whether or not you want to believe it, it is easier to tip a thinner board on edge than a wider one. It's physics bro... I shouldn't even have to bother proving it. Ask anyone who rides an alpine board (THIN) OR any skier switching from fat powder skis to thinner groomer carving skis. The skinny options are easier to turn and carve.

I went from a NS Proto CTX (wide) last season to a Proto CT (normal) this season with both boards within 1cm of each other. The heightened level of control and EASE of carving on the less wide model is astounding and is the ENTIRE reason why I switched boards. I could carve the crap out of any hill on the wide model, but the thinner one was simply easier and more of a pleasure to ride, because less effort/less input was required to turn and carve. It was much easier to do clean, carved, cross-under turns, which is a good test of edge to edge quickness. So there is some actual hands on research for you.
 

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what size boot?...if it's less that 13 you have the option of a narrow...remember we are not talking about you
 

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At size 13 there are plenty of options in the low 26.X cm range that would work without having to jump to a full on wide 26.8+ board.

Regardless of boot size, a more narrow board is generally faster edge to edge.
 

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As stated below, overhang does not equal drag. I think it is really important to get past this "minimizing drag" thing, and realize that the angles required for drag are substantial and most people take it too far when looking at reducing the amount of overhang. There are stigmas against wide boards for a reason, because many people think they need a wider board so there is NO overhang and that is simply not true. They end up getting a wider board than they actually need and the board is slow edge to edge and can be a bitch to turn, ESPECIALLY for a beginner. It is correct to look at the numbers, but it is also important to realize that an inch of overhang will never be a problem for anyone but the most skilled and precise carvers on steep terrain. A small amount of overhang places the areas of maximum foot pressure (ball of foot) directly over the edge or closer to it, thus increasing fine control and reducing the amount of pressure needed to get a particular result (turning.) If you cannot achieve this small amount of toe overhang in a situation where the board is too wide or the edges are at the very tips of the boot, you want to adjust the baseplate to move the binding closer to the toe and then add some highback lean. Moving your binding closer to the toe moves the ball of your foot closer to the edge, increasing toe edge control. You WILL have reduced feel/control on your heel edge by moving your heel further from the edge, so you want to increase highback lean to increase the ease and lessen the effort to get the board up on the heel edge.

I do the above when instructing, when beginners complain that it is hard to turn on to their toe side. I have ALWAYS seen an improvement after doing this binding adjustment and am usually met with very excited comments about how a simple binding alteration made snowboarding "so much easier."

For the OP, if you get a size 13 boot with shrinkage tech, you shouldn't really need to look at any board over a 26.3 ish cm waist.
That. It is important to understand that most riders should have some overhang - in fact, it is generally best to have a little overhang with bare feet, in which case there definitely will be overhang with boots. That is not only acceptable, but actually proper/preferable.

And wider board are indeed most certainly slower edge-to-edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wow alot of good info thanks everyone. Seems that a lot of people say its about binding board boot combo to determine the overhang. I'm just not sure how to calculate what the overhang would be from strictly building packages online and such. I'm new to equipment research, are there any 13's out there that have a good set up with the ideal overhang? Like I said I really like the rossi angus and onemagtek, I'm pretty sure they are both 26.4 cm widths. However if they are a little on the slim side for my size I obviously open to anything. Thanks again guys
 

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If they are 26.4's you will have no issue at all. I wear a 13 and my boards all fall in the 26.3-26.6 range. If toe/heel drag could cause a problem for me they wouldve. Dont go below 26.0 though. (i know its 3mm but it does make a difference)
 
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