Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Heading to Co. on Sun. and we are taking both sleds. Anyone got any tips on where to go ride sleds/boards? Nothing to extreme because we don't have any BC experience, just someplace to play.
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
Any place you go and can ride your snowboard is going to have avalanche danger. Steep enough to ride, steep enough to slide. Those are the facts.

Vail Pass is the most popular area and for just sled necking around you can stay out of trouble. Keep in mind what I said above as there are plenty of terrain traps and avy slopes up there. Another spot would be Hoosier Pass just south of Breck. Not much good riding there from what I have seen, but lot's of places to get your sled on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Kill, do you know if there are any guide services that could show us around and keep us out of trouble?
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
I don't know of any guide services for sledding around. Vail Snowcats may have some ideas for you. There are also a couple of sled rental operators on the pass that may have some info too, I don't know their names, I am sure a google search would point you in the right direction. You might also trying surfing the snowmobile forums and see if there are any groups getting out while you are here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips. How much and what type of gear shold we plan on bringing? Both sleds already have shovels on them. I'm assuming a probe would be a good idea. As far as beacons and gps can we rent those anyplace? Also any good sites to read up on BC saftey? Normally I'd just do all the searches and research, but I have a lot of work to get done before I go.
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
Check out the stickied links in the back country forum for some reading info.

Shovel, Beacon, probe are the basics you should have. I think Wilderness Sports in Silverthorne rents beacons, but not many places do. You also need to know how to use them, so if this is your first time, I'd suggest putting an transmitting beacon in a pack and burying it in the snow, and then locating it. From 25 yards out you should be able to locate and get a probe strike on a buried beacon in under 3 minutes. Shouldn't take you long to get there, but this is something you don't want to learn under live fire.

GPS shouldn't really be needed unless you are prone to getting lost.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Check out the stickied links in the back country forum for some reading info.

Shovel, Beacon, probe are the basics you should have. I think Wilderness Sports in Silverthorne rents beacons, but not many places do. You also need to know how to use them, so if this is your first time, I'd suggest putting an transmitting beacon in a pack and burying it in the snow, and then locating it. From 25 yards out you should be able to locate and get a probe strike on a buried beacon in under 3 minutes. Shouldn't take you long to get there, but this is something you don't want to learn under live fire.

GPS shouldn't really be needed unless you are prone to getting lost.
Heading to the BC section after I post this ;)

That is a great tip thanks man. I plan on moving more towards BC riding over the next couple years. I know I'll need a couple seasons to hone my skills on the open mountain. That's ok though, I'm one of those people that likes to take small steps at things and learn everything I can about what I'm doing. Are there any areas of the pass that are more beginner friendly? What about parking areas with a trailer?

My sense of direction has always been excellent, and I doubt we are going stray to far up the mountain. We're doing 3 days at the resorts (a-basin/Key) and 3 days on the pass. How are the crowds this time of year at the resorts?

Again thanks for the tips :thumbsup:
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
Vail pass has a huge parking area for sledders. Keep in mind there is a $6 per head fee for day use of the area. It's part of that Forest service fee demo program. Lame, but it is what it is. Hoosier pass has plenty of people running around on sleds so there is parking for vehicles with trailers there, I am just not sure about how much and location. For Vail Pass it's pretty obvious. The parking is right next to where you pay the day fee.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top