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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys

Basically I'm 190cm and 66Kg However size 13-14 boot. (6'3, and 146 pounds) Ive ridden for the past few years on Australian snow and only a week or two each year. In the past I have only used K2 clicker bindings and boots, however as my boots have worn (and being unable to source any new ones) out late last season. I switched to K2 Dariko boots and flow flite 1 bindings.

I recently have purchased some Rome 390's Boss bindings. I traditionally rode 15/0 and basically did groomers and power. But plan to do a little more park and have tried 15/-15 however my legs got very sore (from incorrect posture?) So this year I'm going to try (12/-12)

Now my final decision is to decide which board I will ride. I have a few to choose from but most are older boards which I cannot find a review on Online so perhaps you guys can help me. All three boards I have are around 158cm (i know its large for my weight but it's what I have learn't on and smaller boards just feel to loose) The only aspect they differ in visually is the amount of camber in them? What does this mean in respect to riding feel? My sapient is in the middle with moderate raise in the guts. The arbor has the most shape and a substantial raise in the guts. I have another board loose unit with very little raise in the camber but that may just be because its old. Just wondering if you guys could explain what the difference in raise will mean for riding and which would suit me best. Any other advise would be very helpful as well.

Regards in Advance Tyson.
 

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Hi Tyson,

Your Arbor board is a Draft from 2006. They were doing that deck in Camber back then (it switched to system rocker in 2009). The Draft has always been Street/Park/Jib oriented. That is what you have there.

There is a lot in your post so let me see if I can hit some of the points.

Camber: Think of any cambered section on a snowboard as stored energy. A spring that will compress and decompress. Camber adds pop and helps you transition from edge to edge. The downside of pure camber models is that they tend to place the contact points on the snow and can be the most catchy of all designs. Camber in itself (especially going back to 2006 when almost everything was still camber) tells you very little about what a board was designed to do. Back then Street boards, Big Mountain boards and everything in between were all produced in cambered profiles.

Stance: Do not ride in pain to achieve a stance that has been suggested to you. Your body will tell you what stance is correct for you. Any benefit that you might notice from riding overly duck for your body will be lost and then some by riding in with uncomfortable angles. I would suggest that you go the opposite way. Return to your known comfortable stance, and then move your back binding gradually more to duck in small increments. Start at -5 and then go in bumps of 3.

Rome 390 Boss: Stoked that you have moved to this binding from your clickers. What cant are you using? These come with 3 options and often more cant can reduce pain when going duck. If you are riding the flat bases (0 degree) I would suggest bumping up to the 2 or 3.5 degree plates. It can help a LOT.

Finally, let us know a bit about your riding style. Where do you spend your time on the hill? What are your goals?

PS: We are jealous of your upcoming winter.

Stoked for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
First up big thanks wiredsports for the detailed response.

First up would the higher (more defined) camber profile mean it has an ability to store more energy in the arbor in comparison to the sapient?
I couldn't find a detailed description on the 2006 arbor but I did find this on the 2009 sapient PNB1:
(Company Description:
This is a high performance freestyle machine. This board is meant to go everywhere but more specifically, with its centred stance and flex, it is a Pipe demon and park monster. This is seriously one of the best boards you will ever ride. The PNB1 is packed full of all the most advanced materials available, and has earned accolades as one of the best freestyle boards in the market today, and the clear Sirlin sidwalls are really cool. This board meant for the 100+ day rider.
Technology/Features:
Core: Aspen, Birch mix, very light and super strong for the daily core freestyle abuse Laminate: Kevlar, Carbon, Quadrax mix that gives a pretty stiff and snappy board Base: IS7500 with the famous STRUC TURN and Nano additives to be superfast Shape: True Twin Sidecut: Transitional )

I did notice the PNB1 is .5cm larger in smallest width so perhaps better for my larger boot size?

Atm I put in cant at 2 as it was just in the middle. From doing a little research most people seem to recommend 2.5 but that doesn't seem to be an option with the bosses. Can I get a feel for it sitting the board on carpet with boots and bindings.(It seems people say 4 is to much so not sure if I should go 3.5 or not?)

Also in regards to the highback rotation I want it so the back is parallel with the edge of the board? Is this ok when even when the highback angle is adjusted the boot doesn't sit square in the binding?

As for riding style mainly just going down groomed runs and have just started to hit a few small jumps and boxes. Though basically getting no air. This season would like to hit a few bigger jumps and ride switch a little more.

Regards In advance Tyson.
 

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Stoked to help Tyson,

If all things were equal (core construction, laminates, contact length, etc) then more camber would indicate more stored energy but when trying to use that factor alone to determine performance between models it is not extremely valuable.

Please measure the width of each board at the inserts that you would use. Waist width is not a good indicator of what foot size a board will work well with. Please also measure the contact length of each (wide point to wide point).

Please measure your foot using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters).

You can get a reasonably good idea of how cant will feel just by strapping in on carpet. For me, 3.5 is awesome and makes an immediately noticeable difference even when strapping in dry. This is very personal and depends on your anatomy. The same is true of highback rotation. I ride with my backs adjusted to parallel with the edge, but many others find that uncomfortable.

We will dial you in!
 

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For stance you don't need to put 15,-15 unless you plan on riding switch a lot. Just play around with it, it will be a lot more fun and less tiring if you keep that back foot quite a bit less angled than the front if you're not planning on riding a lot of switch.

As far as the highbacks that depends on you're riding style. Sounds like your a tall skinny dude, a lot like me, and have to assume that you aren't going to be bending you're knees like the shorter guys. I wouldn't set any lean on you're bindings unless you plan on really getting low most the time.

Finally as far as camber goes, it depends on the base, weave, flex, materials etc,. Again, its all personal at the point. Just ride what ever feels best to you. Though given your weight and the fact that you are going to be riding a wide, I would find something that initiates and holds a good fast edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Hey guys here are stats:

Foot size: 29.2cm
Boot size (outside shell) : 34cm

Sapient:
Width at bindings (perpendicular to edge): 26.7cm
length between center of bindings:59.5cm

Arbor:
Width at bindings (perpendicular to edge): 26cm
length between center of bindings:60cm

length between centers can be adjusted but thats just what Ive had them set up as in the past.

EDIT: I have also attached pictures of how the boot is sitting in the binding. It just doesn't look right though I have never used conventional bindings so im not really sure.

BTW Thanks very much for all the help guys
 

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Hi Keen,

29.2 cm is actually a size 11. The 29.2 measurement is the only truly important measurement when it comes to selecting the correct board width.

Would you mind measuring the contact length of each board as well (wide point to wide point).
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks again for help wired sports

I think the wide length to wide length of each is:
Sapient: 126cm
Arbor: 128-129cm (much smoother progression into contact points)

Regards Tyson
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
158cm. Is the widest contact points the bits that kick out just before the lift at the nose/tail?

Remeasuring using above technique^ I get
sapient:123cm
arbor:124cm
 

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158cm. Is the widest contact points the bits that kick out just before the lift at the nose/tail?
Yes, that measurement on older cambered boards was very useful as it determined the actual running length of the board. Tip to tip measurement is not that useful.

Remeasuring using above technique^ I get
sapient:123cm
arbor:124cm
Got it. The good news is that both of these boards will work well for your 29.2 feet. I would start with the Arbor. At 26 cm wide at the inserts, you will have 3.2 cm of total barefoot overhang at straight angles (0 degrees). 1.6cm for each toe and heel. At your 15/15 stance that would reduce to about .5 cm of toe and heel overhang. That is perfect.

Other than that you have a great board to advance on and we fully expect to see vids of you slaying the park here soon.

STOKED!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cheers for all the help mate.

Did the previous images about the bindings look like they were set up correctly? Also if you don't mind me asking whats the reason you use you foot length rather then your boot length to assess your board size?
So the arbor should be better all round do you think? It seems like they are pretty similar boards, Ive just waxed them both and am putting the bindings on the arbor now.

Thanks for all the help again, regards Tyson
 

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Hi Keen,

Boot size is not a reliable measurement as there is no consistency between brands. One brands 13 can be another brands 11.5. Even if a rider were actually riding a boot that was too large for their foot, we would still use foot length. Your foot itself provides the leverage you will rely on for control and the extra boot materials that you would have in excess would do nothing to help with that. If a rider has a boot that is genuinely too large, our advice would be that they replace those with snug fitting boots.

Your binding settings look like a good starting place. The most important thing there is that you are centered with equal overhang toe to heel.

STOKED!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I tried on a bunch of sizes in the boot and the other sizes of the brand were just 2 small. The 13 is a snug fit though. I ended up moving the 390's forward one as there was at least a few cm's between the back of the hindback and the boot and its much better now with only a small gap with no angle on the hindback. Really excited to try out my new gear but alas no snow. Probably a blessing in disguise as I have exams next week but after that I'm on break so super keen to head down to the snow (once it arrives).

BTW thanks so much for all the help. Kind regards Tyson.
 

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I tried on a bunch of sizes in the boot and the other sizes of the brand were just 2 small. The 13 is a snug fit though. I ended up moving the 390's forward one as there was at least a few cm's between the back of the hindback and the boot and its much better now with only a small gap with no angle on the hindback. Really excited to try out my new gear but alas no snow. Probably a blessing in disguise as I have exams next week but after that I'm on break so super keen to head down to the snow (once it arrives).

BTW thanks so much for all the help. Kind regards Tyson.
Sounds goods. For reference this is our stock advice for boot fit:

Your boots should be snug!

The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not to tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!
 
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