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The Rooster King
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"The victim was found 24 hours later under 1.5 metres of snow at the leading edge of the avalanche’s path, by crews who had been searching since dawn.

.....An RCMP spokesman says the victim was well prepared and came with all the necessary equipment."

poor article - something doesn't add up. it does not take 24hrs to conduct a beacon search.

"Last week, the Canadian Avalanche Centre issued a special warning to backcountry enthusiasts about the considerable risk in the area."

on the avy scale 'considerable' has some risk, but it can be mitigated with good decisions. you can still go play on a 'considerable' day, just gotta be smart/cautious out there.

sad for sure. snowmobiles are dangerous.
 

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sad...seems like so many of the avy deaths are clearly preventable,i was just reading the big New York Times article about the Steven's Pass tragedy, so many red flags

...just...sad on many levels
 

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Premium Member
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"The victim was found 24 hours later under 1.5 metres of snow at the leading edge of the avalanche’s path, by crews who had been searching since dawn.

.....An RCMP spokesman says the victim was well prepared and came with all the necessary equipment."

poor article - something doesn't add up. it does not take 24hrs to conduct a beacon search.

"Last week, the Canadian Avalanche Centre issued a special warning to backcountry enthusiasts about the considerable risk in the area."

on the avy scale 'considerable' has some risk, but it can be mitigated with good decisions. you can still go play on a 'considerable' day, just gotta be smart/cautious out there.

sad for sure. snowmobiles are dangerous.
1.5 meters seems relatively shallow. How far away do you have to be to lose a beacon signal at that depth?
 

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poor article - something doesn't add up. it does not take 24hrs to conduct a beacon search.

"Peter Reid, President of the Kimberley Search and Rescue, immediately launched a rescue operation after the call came in, but dangerous conditions kept them from reaching the scene."

they didnt want to lose anyone else
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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Discussion Starter #8
poor article - something doesn't add up. it does not take 24hrs to conduct a beacon search.
I think this is the explanation in the article:

Peter Reid, President of the Kimberley Search and Rescue, immediately launched a rescue operation after the call came in, but dangerous conditions kept them from reaching the scene.

“It was too unsafe for the rescuers even to be there,” says BC Coroner Bar McLintock. “The Canadian Avalanche Centre, the search and rescue specialists and avalanche specialists had to go in and do some blasting (with explosives) just to make it safe.”


So they may have had to wait until the next morning to begin avalanche control, and then rescue?!?

I was just in Kimberley boarding a week ago, and there was very little snow in the area. That's what's shocked me the most, they haven't had fresh snow for ages! Temps have been above zero for a while during the day...

BTW here's yesterdays forecast for the area. Purcells : Latest Bulletins : Bulletins : Canadian Avalanche Centre : avalanche.ca
 

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Veteran Member
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1.5 meters is over four feet deep. Probably about two tons of snow you'd have to move to get to the victim. Beacons will definitely pick that up.

I read about this accident yesterday. Sounds like there was a lot of hangfire involved. Rescue teams blasted and brought down more snow before going in.

I am unsure about the dynamics of the beacon search. As shred said, something seems a little off.
 

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The Rooster King
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well yea, S&R is going to wait till they deem it safe to go in but in an avalanche S&R is generally for body recovery - not rescue.

you have 15 minutes to rescue. the rest of the party not buried should be performing rescue if they had beacons probes and shovels. you really gonna not go onto the debris pile with your buddy dying in there? it would really have to be some pretty imminent hangfire. i mean fuck you're on sleds.

one thing is for sure - this is a poorly written, vague article.
 

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Hard to say Shred. In that situation, I know sure as shit I wouldn't expose the whole party to the hangfire threat. One person, quick search to see if you can get a hit, probably. You would want minimal people out there.

This scenario is most definitely the most nightmarish I can think of. You have a group that (hopefully) is equipped for a rescue, but it may not be safe to do so. Getting more people buried does not help.

All accounts were that this one was a fairly large slide. The official report is going to be an interesting read.
 

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Rides Caturdayz
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Seems like Purcell is pretty dangerous. Didn't the rk heli death happen in the same range?
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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Discussion Starter #15
Seems like Purcell is pretty dangerous. Didn't the rk heli death happen in the same range?
Yeah, sounds like that one happened near Jumbo glacier. They do seem to get a different snow than we do from Lake Louise east. Every time I look at the forecasts, average temps on that side of the rockies are 5+ deg higher. That's got to have an effect on the snow (both falling snow and the snowpack)...
 

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Any range with avalanche terrain is dangerous. Coastal mountains, Purcells, Rockies, you name it. If it's steep enough to ride it's steep enough to slide.

Glancing through some Canadian accident history. The Banff area seems to have the Lion's share of the accidents. I do believe that is or more of a continental style snow pack so it would make sense. Purcells don't stand out as a unusually dangerous spot at a glance.
 
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