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T bars are a doddle. One of my favourite areas has ten of these, no chairs and not many snowboarders!
We used to have those on the toplift back in the days. Fun as hell, remember we could do 7’s on them when the snow was low. Just brake to load the spring up and pop! Now they moved them to the kiddy hill. Fat t bars are a problem for kids with a short stance, those plate things is impossible! My 4 year old rides the normal t bar with no problems, but those are a no-go.
 

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I use "Pomas" in between de the legs and have never seen anyone using them differently. In French we call them "tire-cul", literally "ass-dragger"... Which is explicit enough on where to put them

We have T-bars mostly on glacier. In les 2 Alpes summer park it was a whole skillset to grab one midair, circle carve to join a friend (or total stranger...), ride it 6 people on one bar, to avoid the queue!

Envoyé de mon H8324 en utilisant Tapatalk
 

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Pomas between the legs would cause you to twist on a snowboard, it’s another design for skiers! Depends if there is a fixed pole from the disc I guess vs just a rope.
First time I’m hearing of this. For over 26 years og riding and with a lot of different people, not one I’ve ridden with has had that problem. Fixed pole with a spring up top, no rope. Only problem with them I’ve come up on is that my youngst struggles to get the disc between her legs due to the short stance.
 

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Yeah, when I was 5/6 yo, my local resort had only these, I was just flying in some sections.

That and considering myself lucky to still be able to have children, because those things can really smash your balls!

Envoyé de mon H8324 en utilisant Tapatalk
 

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It’s been a long time since I used them, they’ve been phased out for magic carpets around here. At least I don’t have to show my kids!

Guess you guys are right! I just recall it not working well that way.
 

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The type of lift with discs on the end of a bar are called pomas (Poma lift), they sit under your armpit when snowboarding
The button lifts with a retractable rope are very gentle and only found in beginner areas, it's possible you could use one of these under your arm. Most sprung pole type are fine once you get used to them (I have tell some of my friends this year after year though 😁) but a few vicious ones will launch you into the air. This is the worst when the track starts level so you overtake the pole, flail around a bit before coming to a halt and then get launched into the air for a second time as the bastard pole overtakes you again!

"Under my armpit?" 🤔 No thanks
 

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First and only time ever on a poma was 2004 in France at the top of the mountain on a somewhat steep slope and what seemed like a really long ride. Never seen anything like it as I had never even tried a t-bar or rope tow. Took me 2 tries to get on one (after the requisite embarassing being dragged along the ground on the initial attempt) and used the hook behind front thigh method. It was worth the ride for the untracked powder runs.
 

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Never seen a poma outside of learner areas! Is it worse than a T-bar on a steep slope?
We had them on the top lift wich was the steepest part of the mountain. They could lift you way up in the air if the snow was low. And the start would launch you from 0 to what felt like a million miles pr hour in a second. So they would be scary for someone not used to them. Every one at my local loved them though, way more fun than the t bars lower down. Brake, pop and air!
 

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Never seen a poma outside of learner areas! Is it worse than a T-bar on a steep slope?
Better than a T bar on steep slopes. Some will say "Expert skiers only" because of the steepness and remoteness from a piste.

I've just remembered another issue with them for snowboarders. Where the wires hang low and there has been a lot of snow any unoccupied buttons (gate fails) will drag in the snow creating a trench about a foot wide and up to a foot deep. Essential to avoid but pretty difficult unless experienced.

Also, camber boards are much more difficult to control on these lifts. I couldn't believe how much easier my first flat board was.
 

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Pomas.... they can be a bit of a nightmare as a beginner, leaving you mentally scarred for life:
Getting slingshotted out the gate, your backfoot slipping off the board whilst trying to get the button in to the least-uncomfortable position, burning front leg from a never-ending steep section, bruised thighs from the button, the path pitching away to the left/right causing your board to drift one way whilst the rope pulls you the other, making it 3/4 of the way up, falling and have to do it all over again 😂 - happy memories!!

I didn't want to miss out by always avoiding them (and some places where there was no other option) so I forced myself to ride them with a list of mental cues to help me:
Weight on front foot, shoulders aligned with the board, rear hand towards/over tail, hold the pole gently (don't pull on it - let it pull you), generally just be a passenger (but anticipate where you might need to be a bit more active with your edges) and finally... don't forget to breathe and relax :)
Don't mind them so much now (front leg still burns on the long ones!).

I was initially taught to ride them one footed so I assumed you had to do it this way but then another instructor told me to strap in both feet (and then got me doing 180 nose rolls back and forth "to practice in case I want to give my front leg a rest"). I generally still ride them one footed unless they are particularly awkward. 2 footed feels like I'm doing something illegal 🤣 I assume everyone talking about getting air is riding 2 footed?
 

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Pomas.... they can be a bit of a nightmare as a beginner, leaving you mentally scarred for life:
Getting slingshotted out the gate, your backfoot slipping off the board whilst trying to get the button in to the least-uncomfortable position, burning front leg from a never-ending steep section, bruised thighs from the button, the path pitching away to the left/right causing your board to drift one way whilst the rope pulls you the other, making it 3/4 of the way up, falling and have to do it all over again 😂 - happy memories!!

I didn't want to miss out by always avoiding them (and some places where there was no other option) so I forced myself to ride them with a list of mental cues to help me:
Weight on front foot, shoulders aligned with the board, rear hand towards/over tail, hold the pole gently (don't pull on it - let it pull you), generally just be a passenger (but anticipate where you might need to be a bit more active with your edges) and finally... don't forget to breathe and relax :)
Don't mind them so much now (front leg still burns on the long ones!).

I was initially taught to ride them one footed so I assumed you had to do it this way but then another instructor told me to strap in both feet (and then got me doing 180 nose rolls back and forth "to practice in case I want to give my front leg a rest"). I generally still ride them one footed unless they are particularly awkward. 2 footed feels like I'm doing something illegal 🤣 I assume everyone talking about getting air is riding 2 footed?
Fall on one those with both feet straped in and you will end up in a hospital if your board get’s caught by the plate… there is no way of and you are in for one hell of ride. Always one footer on both those and t bars. One footer for air time too, easy to learn - just angle/tip your front foot so the board is flat during air.

The more i read about this the more i see the difference of what people are used to. For people at my local this is not a issue, it has always been like this so every one just have to learn it.
 
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