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Discussion Starter #1
I'm asking because I'm to figure out if i should invest in a "powder" board. What exactly counts as powder, with regards to how it effects the board? I plan on spending most of my time at mammoth this season and i always thought that was considered powder but it seems that a board that does well on the main runs is not the same as a board that will do good in conditions where the snow hasn't been touched?

So what are the different kinds of powder, and how do they effect the float of the board?
 

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If you're not that familiar with powder, then you probably don't want a powder specific board. Any board can ride powder, it's just that some ride much better than others.

Powder can be generally defined as a snow surface which is not groomed or tracked out - AKA untouched. Powder boards are designed to float on the snow. When you ride powder, there is technically no effective edge that you have to maintain like you do on hardpacked groomers. As of such, the sidecut and shape are designed for maximum floatation. Some boards use rocker, which means the board V's up from it's center. This helps keep your tip up so you can ride effectively; If you can't keep your front tip up, you will sink and have a horrible time.

For all mountain purposes, I would recommend getting a directional board that utilizes some sort of rocker. A powder specific board tends to ride poorly on groomers and tracked out terrain, which can be frustrating. Mammoth also gets tracked out ridiculously fast. You will spend much more of your time riding tracked out terrain then you will untouched powder, so why invest in a board only built for powder.

That's my two cents anyways.
 

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I agree with the above, you don't need a specific powder deck. With that said a short, soft, cambered freestyle deck is going to be pretty frustrating espescially if the snow gets heavy. What do you ride now?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
awesome thanks you guys. I don't have my own board yet but last season i went to mammoth with the morrow lithium and that was awesome (it's a full cambered board (can't find the camber size) thats built so you sit back on the board. I loved the board but i want something a little faster (which made me think camber or c3) but I wasn't sure how those would run on "powder." I liked the deck because i felt like i had alot of control, but i would of liked it to have a little more power behind it (i think the base was pretty scratched up though)

Right now I plan on renting/demoing the DC ply, a lib tech TRS, and something else when i visit mammoth to get a feel for what i want. And maybe a c2 if I really enjoy the rocker but I'm more about speed and carving than rotating about the center, although if that really helps control (and not just in the sense of "it makes it harder to make a mistake, but genuinely makes it so you have more control when cruisin good, then id consider a rocker.

You guys got any recommendations? I can get 50 percent off DC boards because my friend works at quicksilver, but I'm thinking she can get 50 percent of lib tech and GNU too for that same reason... one would think anyways.
 

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My first board was a Morrow Lithium. What a plank! Stiffest board I've ever owned.

The Lithium is an extruded base and not particularly fast. When you upgrade to a sintered-base board, you are going to be scared witless your first couple of times.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
it felt pretty loose and playful for me but then again im 190 5 ft 11 and it only just passed the start of my neck.
 

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I loved the board but i want something a little faster (which made me think camber or c3) but I wasn't sure how those would run on "powder." I liked the deck because i felt like i had alot of control, but i would of liked it to have a little more power behind it (i think the base was pretty scratched up though)

... but I'm more about speed and carving than rotating about the center, although if that really helps control (and not just in the sense of "it makes it harder to make a mistake, but genuinely makes it so you have more control when cruisin good, then id consider a rocker.
It seems you have not had much big pow experience...based on your ? and your wants...

First, there's different kinds of pow...

Next,...alittle faster = steeper slope or bigger pow deck

Lastly, riding pow is to a lesser extent about control...and more about picking your lines wisely and waiting for the turn to happen...thus not about "power" but about finesse.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It seems you have not had much big pow experience...based on your ? and your wants...

First, there's different kinds of pow...

Next,...alittle faster = steeper slope or bigger pow deck

Lastly, riding pow is to a lesser extent about control...and more about picking your lines wisely and waiting for the turn to happen...thus not about "power" but about finesse.
I don't have much experience, it would appear I've only been on groomed runs, which was why i wanted to know more about what was invovled board wise with powder. the rest i can figure out by just playing around.

So you're saying that the camber profile doesn't effect the speed in powder?

Interesting. Sounds like something I'll have to experience to understand. How exactly does one end up off the groomed trails anyways? Do you just keep your eyes open on the way down for un-groomed terrain that aren't too full of trees (i suppose I'll wanna hit the ungroomed trails higher up the mountain then too)
 

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Just start riding pow...

Besides different pow...heavy, soft, fluff, blower and bottom or bottomless and knee, balls and titty deep

There is also different pow terrain...bowls, trees, chutes, steeps and low angle

Any board can ride pow...

Riding pow is a different skill set...

A pow board just makes it easier.

So what kind of pow, how much pow and the pow terrain will somewhat determine the appropriate pow board...an appropriate matched board is heaven...or a board that is not up to the pow condition...can be hellish.

But don't fret...just start hitting pow stashes, it will become clear from your mistakes.
 

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For groomer and occasional off-piste riding I like directional RCR (or camrock) profile most. You get the stability of the camber between the feet if riding groomers and the early rising rocker in the nose helps a lot with float in fresh.

Considering definitions, there seems to be regional differences... we rate the light cold fluffy stuff as powder (the snow that won't be any good to make a snowball cos it isn't sticky. Riding this is more like surfing, since your edges won't bite). The wet heavy snow is just fresh snow or deep snow. Depending on conditions/terrain, there's also wind blown crusts.
 

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The only TRUE powder in North America falls in the Rockies!!!! :yahoo:

Powder is fluffy white shit that you sometimes can't feel the bottom of. A few inches of powder isn't a "POW DAY MAN!!!" it's just some fresh fluff on top. I'd say 6"+ is needed to get any kind of "powder" experience, and even then, it's much better when it's 6 FEET. :blink:
 

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Stashes are nice, but when you're new to pow surfing the only way to really get a feel for it is to get those fresh tracks on wide open fields of fresh.
 

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I don't call it a powder day unless its over about 14". I don't think it can count if you can make a hard turn and feel your tail hit something hard underneath.
 

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proverbial cart before the horse scenario
I think this explains the OP's situation quite well...

You should go and try to ride powder before you worry about if your board can handle it.

Here's a few tips, because if you try to ride Powder like you do a groomer, you're gonna have a bad time.

- For now, just try doing side-hits. These are the patches of untouched snow off to the side of groomers. The idea is that if you get stuck, you can get back to the groomer relatively easily. Getting stuck is a major reality when you're new to powder. It can be like trying to wade through a lake if you don't know what your doing.

- Pick lines that are as steep as possible. This might seem counterintuitive if your new to it, but unlike a groomer, powder slows you down. If you can't get enough speed in the stuff, your going to have a bad time.

- Lean back! Distribute your weight so that more is placed on your back foot. This will keep your tip up so that you don't sink or faceplant.

- Don't try to carve or make sharp turns in powder. Your front edge will dig in and you will stop very quickly, or eat shit. Lean back and gently use your weight to turn the board.

 

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Discussion Starter #18
faaaantastic. Alright cool i think that about covers all the bases, thanks guys.

I'll have to give it a shot my next trip after a storm. Lookin forward to it :cheeky4:
 
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