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Discussion Starter #1
I found some videos of Switch Boards on FB. There is a lot of complex stuff that I will never be good at, but I also saw a short part of a video where the guy was standing onto two balance disks with his training board. He was trying to balance himself on the board, shifting his weight here and there, moving upper body mimicking snowboard movements.

Considering that I cannot go snowboarding possibly till next year, is a similar setup someway useful? Are there some exercises that I can do in similar setup to maybe form some muscle memory? Video is short and the parts where the guy actually stays on top of those disks is even smaller. So if I have to judge, I would say "mostly harmless".

Note that I am already doing general physical exercises (pilates for core, squats and lounges, etc) as normal routine.

training.png
 

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As an owner of Snowboard Addiction equipment (Switch Boards is the same concept) I have some doubts if this significantly helps you with your regular riding. Balance when riding is created in conjunction with the edge control and that's what you cannot train on this equipment. They are great for training freestyle body positions, balance on boxes and rails, air awareness in jumps, and general conditioning. But I don't think it's worth buying it just to train regular riding technique. If you do, you should also try to do that "complex stuff" because it eventually makes you a better snowboarder.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your answer, @lbs123. I suspected that as well.
However, I have nothing to buy for this setup to be ready. This is why it seems appealing to me.
 

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Well, not saying you shouldn't buy it, but if you do, don't limit yourself to just balancing on those disks. For example flatground 180s with rotation and counter rotation can be useful for better understanding the concept of rotation and counter rotation which is used in regular riding too (often wrongly, though). Of course, you can practice those without a training board, but it definitely gives you more realistic feel.

Other option you might consider is skateboarding, although it can be a bit intimidating (falling on concrete is not fun). Then there are also those balance boards for a general balance training, that could be a cheaper option too.
 

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As an owner of Snowboard Addiction equipment (Switch Boards is the same concept) I have some doubts if this significantly helps you with your regular riding. Balance when riding is created in conjunction with the edge control and that's what you cannot train on this equipment. They are great for training freestyle body positions, balance on boxes and rails, air awareness in jumps, and general conditioning. But I don't think it's worth buying it just to train regular riding technique. If you do, you should also try to do that "complex stuff" because it eventually makes you a better snowboarder.
There is a man who genuinely should know his shit! It's important to have people on here with a wide variety of skills I think. Must admit I just get on a vibrating platform to try and get my legs strong before heading overseas on a trip. No idea what a 'core' is either but balance is fine, I think anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks @lbs123, let me search about flatground 180. I watched tons of beginner videos, 'link turns' level and also about carving (even if I am definitely not yet there), but I am a little lost about other fun stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ok, I officially have an addiction problem now: I saw videos of snowboard addiction jib training. I must do those exercises :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
They're totally unrelated to my current snowboard skills, but who cares: it's pandemic time!

I wonder what I can actually learn...
 

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I totally understand you - it's intriguing to see all those various tricks and a be able to train them in the safe environment with minimal setup. Another advantage is that you can easily record yourself at home and check your posture, movements, etc. Even if you are not going to ride real boxes or rails on the snow anytime soon, learning how to execute those tricks properly (even the simple ones) will definitely translate to your overall riding competence and confidence.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok I tried jumping up with both feet strapped in my snowboard. I also tried to Jump forward and backward, to jump and rotate and to jump over a wood stick.
Unfortunately I jump very low, jumping high has never been my best skill even when I played volleyball. Also, landing is hard on my knees, even if I try to land soft.
Anyway, so far so good for first try :)
 

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Look into learning how to ollie. You use the board as a spring to catapult you into a jump. You can jump way higher with less effort this way. It teaches you how to load pressure into your tips as well.
 

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Ok I tried jumping up with both feet strapped in my snowboard. I also tried to Jump forward and backward, to jump and rotate and to jump over a wood stick.
Unfortunately I jump very low, jumping high has never been my best skill even when I played volleyball. Also, landing is hard on my knees, even if I try to land soft.
Anyway, so far so good for first try :)
Make sure you dont press too much on flatground with a real snowboard, its not good for your hips, the side thats not pressing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Look into learning how to ollie. You use the board as a spring to catapult you into a jump. You can jump way higher with less effort this way. It teaches you how to load pressure into your tips as well.
I tried also nose and tail presses. In the video the guy says to shift the weight on the nose/tail. I tried, but I think I am doing it wrong. Tail/nose does not lift up, unless I actively raise it with my feet. I'll look again into videos on the topic as I think I am missing something.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Make sure you dont press too much on flatground with a real snowboard, its not good for your hips, the side thats not pressing.
I don't understand what do you mean with "don't press too much". Like in nose/tail press? Thanks.

Also, I will ask to my hubbie to make some videos to me tonight to see how stupid I look!
 

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Got a thick old wool rug (or matt), folded in half in the basement. First practice some of the movements without the board on your feet. For example, practice spinning 180...just hop up, rotate and land 180. Then try it without winding up by leading the rotation with your hips. Do it both in the toeside and heelside directions. Focus on how you move with different body parts, like your shoulders, hips, hands while thinking about how you are stacking, aligning and where that weight is on your feet. After you get comfortable, then strap on your board and do it. Ime, by breaking it down and getting some of the prep movements nailed helps to progress faster than going for the end game from the beginning.
 

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I don't understand what do you mean with "don't press too much". Like in nose/tail press? Thanks.

Also, I will ask to my hubbie to make some videos to me tonight to see how stupid I look!
Yes nose/tail press. I just dont think its healthy doing that too much when standing still.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks @Rip154, I get it now.
Yesterday I tried again simple jumps on same spot and jumps back and forth, always landing on both feet. Basically I am doing quads exercises. I plan to go on with more of these.
I also tried nose/tail presses (no jumping here) and I think I understood how it should be done. If I push my hips on top of the nose of the board, I am still balanced becasue other foot lifts from the floor and balances me back. Not sure if this is understandable, nor if it is correct.

Got a thick old wool rug (or matt), folded in half in the basement. First practice some of the movements without the board on your feet. For example, practice spinning 180...just hop up, rotate and land 180. Then try it without winding up by leading the rotation with your hips. Do it both in the toeside and heelside directions. Focus on how you move with different body parts, like your shoulders, hips, hands while thinking about how you are stacking, aligning and where that weight is on your feet. After you get comfortable, then strap on your board and do it. Ime, by breaking it down and getting some of the prep movements nailed helps to progress faster than going for the end game from the beginning.
I have the exact rug setup you are mentioning, @wrathfuldeity. I tried 180 spinning without the board and I feel it easy. I do it with hands on shoulder always in same position wrt to rest of the body, so I guess I am starting rotation with my hips. No issues in that, but I always jump very low.
When I tried with board on, another story. I do the same movements, but my 180° becomes roughly a 100/120°. Feet are waaaay heavier...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@lbs123, can you please tell me how wide is Snowboard Addiction balance bar at its top (without the white part)? On the website they say it is 20cm wide, but I guess this is the bottom part and it gets thinner at the top.
Looking into the web, I bet it could be 12 to 15cm. Am I right?
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Tonight my hubbie has made a couple of videos of me jumping around in snowboard & boots. I am so happy as I jump higher than I expected :eek::eek::eek:
I am doing very basic repetitions, ones proposed into 'getting comfortable' videos on jibbing series of snowboard addiction. I am trying to jump over a cardboard stick on the floor and I am no longer afraid of that.
I also tried full nose tail presses (not only shifting my weight buy actually jumping). Those are still awful, I hope I can do better after more attempts.

Ah yes, I forgot to mention that I have to fix what we can call 'volleyball arms': I use also my arms to give me momentum to jump, like it has to be done in volleyball...
 

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I'd be surprised if most of that gear isn't more of a placebo in regards to off snow training, in fact I'm curious whether it might even introduce bad habits.

I've got a OneWheel I've been using a bit this off-season and I'm interested to see if it has any affect on my riding improving, I'm not sure. I've been in the gym 3 or 4 times a week mainly cardio, upper body and core and I reckon if my riding improves significantly it'll be more to do with this.
 

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@lbs123, can you please tell me how wide is Snowboard Addiction balance bar at its top (without the white part)? On the website they say it is 20cm wide, but I guess this is the bottom part and it gets thinner at the top.
Looking into the web, I bet it could be 12 to 15cm. Am I right?
Yes, the bottom part is 20 cm, but the top part is more like 9-10cm wide (it's rounded a bit).
 
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