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Discussion Starter #1
As I noted in a previous thread, I'm new to boarding. Just started in late November. I'm still getting used to speed and have been practicing straight runs a bit. My problems are - when I build up what I think is too much speed I: 1) tend to lean back or "sit in the back seat." (It is almost instinctual for me. It is as if I'm so afraid of the speed that I'm leaning away from it!); 2) get too nervous if I feel I'm going to fast and go into a turn. I'd like to get over that fear. I get especially nervous on steeper terrain.

Any advice?
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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Find a nice straight easy slope where you are able to build up more speed than you're comfortable with. Go 3/4 of the way down, stop, note your location, and straight-line it the rest of the way. If you're comfortable with that, then next time stop 20 feet higher up the slope. Rinse, repeat. Any time you feel sketchy, do it again a couple of times without starting higher. Keep it up until you desensitize yourself to the speed.
 

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Stay outta the backseat, and push yourself a little beyond what you're comfortable with. In other words, ride aggressively. Keep your weight forward, and don't fear the speed. It really is just a practice thing. The more you ride, the more comfortable you will get with speed. Also, what Donutz said is good too. :)
 

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Staying out of the backseat is very difficult for new riders because it is actually INSTINCTUAL. It is quite normal to move our arguably most important organ (brain) as far away from our direction of travel so that it is the last thing to collide with any obstacle.

I agree with what was said above. You need to find a place where you know your limits are being approached... the envelope if you will... and try to spend more time in that area. Not scary out of control riding, but on the edge of your seat kind of riding. The more time you spend in that zone, the more comfortable you will get. Start by bombing blue runs. If there is no blue run that gives you that pushing the envelope feeling anymore, then take it to blacks. It's just a matter of pushing yourself, responsibly, to get where you want to be. It won't happen overnight, but it will happen.
 

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Staying out of the backseat is very difficult for new riders because it is actually INSTINCTUAL. It is quite normal to move our arguably most important organ (brain) as far away from our direction of travel so that it is the last thing to collide with any obstacle.

I agree with what was said above. You need to find a place where you know your limits are being approached... the envelope if you will... and try to spend more time in that area. Not scary out of control riding, but on the edge of your seat kind of riding. The more time you spend in that zone, the more comfortable you will get. Start by bombing blue runs. If there is no blue run that gives you that pushing the envelope feeling anymore, then take it to blacks. It's just a matter of pushing yourself, responsibly, to get where you want to be. It won't happen overnight, but it will happen.
+1. Well said.

Somehow you need to push yourself against the envelope to get to the next level. 'Responsibly' is a very good word.
 

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Quick question, are you flat basing or on an edge?
Getting on an edge really helped with feeling in control/confidence, for me anyway. I find it helps put you in the front seat -compared with flat basing anyway
There is that mental barrier which I believe will help to overcome if you ride with someone who is better than you as it helps to push through your comfort zone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great advice, everyone!

Staying out of the backseat is very difficult for new riders because it is actually INSTINCTUAL. It is quite normal to move our arguably most important organ (brain) as far away from our direction of travel so that it is the last thing to collide with any obstacle.

I agree with what was said above. You need to find a place where you know your limits are being approached... the envelope if you will... and try to spend more time in that area. Not scary out of control riding, but on the edge of your seat kind of riding. The more time you spend in that zone, the more comfortable you will get. Start by bombing blue runs. If there is no blue run that gives you that pushing the envelope feeling anymore, then take it to blacks. It's just a matter of pushing yourself, responsibly, to get where you want to be. It won't happen overnight, but it will happen.
Bigmountain, your comments made me feel a lot better. I thought I was being a bit of a wimp because of the fear I was experiencing. I have to admit I'm not ready for the blue runs yet. Today was only my 30th day on a snowboard. So, I'm pretty green.

I am trying steeper slopes and, as suggested by Donutz, starting further down the slope to get used to the speed and then moving higher up the slope to start to become more comfortable with going faster. I guess I just have to be patient and keep putting in the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Quick question, are you flat basing or on an edge?
Getting on an edge really helped with feeling in control/confidence, for me anyway. I find it helps put you in the front seat -compared with flat basing anyway
There is that mental barrier which I believe will help to overcome if you ride with someone who is better than you as it helps to push through your comfort zone.
I am riding slightly on an edge when doing straight runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So grateful for this forum

This forum has been invaluable to me. Since I'm new to boarding I have lots of questions. And I'm super stoked about the sport. So, the insight I've gathered from this site has been critical. Plus, I've watched a number of Snowolf's vids that have been incredibly helpful.

I'm already seeing some positive changes when I'm boarding. Thanks, everyone!
 

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Drop straight down, do a full brake when you feel too fast. Then drop again. You need to know how to be aggressive with your braking. At high speeds, your quads will feel it. When your quads feel it, you need to keep holding it. Right before your quads are ready to pop/rip, do a full brake and feel the juice for one last second before taking the rest.

Attack the hill, drive down the slope, be ready to whip that tail out if you need to stop instantly.

A lot about going fast or going flat is about leg strength. It's very difficult to balance if the rider has weak legs that want to snap out of holding that crouched stance.
 

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The Swiss Miss
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put your front hand on you front knee
+1. Actually, put both hands on your front knee (be careful not to twist your shoulders around though). This will tilt your shoulders just forward enough and parallel to the slope, counteracting your instinct to lean back.
 

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It really is just a practice thing. The more you ride, the more comfortable you will get with speed. :)
This was the key for me. Get as much seat time, so to speak, as possible. Experience has been and always will be the best teacher!


Quick question, are you flat basing or on an edge?
Getting on an edge really helped with feeling in control/confidence, for me anyway.
This definitely gives a more confident feeling under foot. However, the more you ride, the more you will understand the communication between the board and you. Even though I rarely flat base, It doesn't give that unsettling feeling.

You need to find a place where you know your limits are being approached... the envelope if you will... and try to spend more time in that area.
This is how I learn. Once I get confidence in the fundamentals, I say fuck it and go for it. Not always the best method, but that's how I'm wired. I perform best when I'm in a sink or swim situation. The reward is the feeling of accomplishment I get drives my progression. It's a domino effect for me.

Oh yeah, and as long as you know how to stop, you'll be fine. Good luck man!
 

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Another thing to do is:

Go to a very familair and easy run...keep at it and learn to straight line it. While doing this run...make sure:
1) you remain in the front seat,
2) get your alignment and stacking together,
3) work on getting low...crouching down and,
4) then learn to do cross under turns...snapping from edge to edge.

Once you get these things going, your confidence to attack steeper runs will be greater.
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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I would add another thought in here. Maybe straight lining to the point of being uncomfortable isn't the best way to improve your technique?!? I would suggest working on really solid slider turns and carves, and your speed will naturally come up. You'll also be better prepared for handling that speed.

The only time I ever straight line is if I'm trying to get through a long traverse, or if I'm trying to build speed to get into some really hard carving. Otherwise it's not really that fun!?! :dunno:
 

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Pretend theres a big wad of cash on your nose and try to pick it up during your turns... like the horse/carrot idea. It's so much easier to turn and control yourself when your forward in your stance though, just keep at it.
 

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Take that back! I'm not saying do it during learning but yes it is fun haha.
Okay okay it's fun SOMETIMES! :bowdown: Only if it leads into a jump or a hard carve though. If you just straight line and then slow down again at the bottom it's quite anti-climactic!
 

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Okay okay it's fun SOMETIMES! :bowdown: Only if it leads into a jump or a hard carve though. If you just straight line and then slow down again at the bottom it's quite anti-climactic!
For me it's when it leads into weightlessness over rollers, sheer speed and when you get to the bottom your heart has to catch up with the rest of you.
 
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