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CARRABASSETT VALLEY — The 17-year-old skier missing since Sunday from the Sugarloaf ski area was found alive Tuesday morning and told rescuers he built a snow shelter when he realized he was lost, according to the Maine Warden Service.

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Missing skier Nicholas Joy, 17, of Medford, Mass., is led to an ambulance Tuesday morning after spending two nights lost near the Sugaloaf ski area.
Staff photo by David Leaming

Donna Joy becomes emotional as she reflects on the two days her son Nicolas Joy, 17, was missing on Sugarloaf Mountain as she speaks to media at the Franklin Memorial Hospital in Farmington on Tuesday.
Staff photo by Michael G. Seamans
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Nicholas Joy, of Medford, Mass., said he likes to watch survival shows on television and that may be how he learned to make the snow cave, said Sugarloaf General Manager John Diller.

Joy was found around 9 a.m. near Caribou Pond Road, a snowmobile trail on the west side of the ski area. He was conscious and alert, and was taken to Franklin Memorial Hospital in Farmington for evaluation, according to the warden service.


Teen built 'snow cave' while lost near Sugarloaf | The Kennebec Journal, Augusta, ME
 

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I wouldn't be surprised if the battery in his phone died. Smart phones are awesome... But only when they're working.
Yeah fair enough. Maybe it's just me but my phone is charging all night, and then it's got a full battery for a full day at the hill. Usually still have 70% battery or so when I get home. I only use it for pictures and the occasional text while at the hill though.

I guess the overall moral of the story is to not leave the boundary of the resort, right? Right!
 

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No, the moral of the story is don`t leave the boundary if you have zero backcountry skills or common sense. As an avid backpacker and off trail hiker, it absolutely blows my mind how people can get lost in the wilderness out here in the west, let alone from a ski area in Maine....:dunno:
Not all places in the east are that small. If you end up on the backside of the mountain you are probably very far away from the resort bounds and stuck in a thick forest. Sugarloaf's skiable terrain once they complete the expansion will be 1600 acres or so, but keep in mind the actual acreage of the mountain is much greater because they only count the acres of trails and glades that are cut, it's not the full mountain acreage.

Edit: Looked it up, and the ski area actually encompasses a total of 5000 acres.
 

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I agree...dumb kid for getting lost in the first place. Just stay on the freakin trail. Kudos for surviving for two days.

Sugarloaf is actually in a fairly remote part of Maine...theres not much of anything south/southeast of the mountain for a long while. Good thing he ran across a snowmobile track.
 

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couldn't he just ride down the end of the mountain till he found a road path??
No roads to be found there unless you are on the mountains frontside. Sugarloaf is pretty remote, especially if you get lost on the backside of the mountain. Nothing but thick woods. Need to keep to skiers left constantly going down the backside to wrap around to the front otherwise you are a long way from anywhere.
 

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Thats not my point. How in the hell are people so stupid that they get lost? anywhere? To me it doesnt matter if I am in the midst of Denali National Park in Alaska, the Grand Canyon or the Eagle Cap wilderness of eastern Oregon, I just dont understand how people get lost.
Ok, will have to agree with that. I never go out of bounds anywhere unless I am prepared, whether it is research into the area, or having someone with me who is familiar with the area. Though I can't say it's much different than people heading into avalanche terrain without proper knowledge/instruction and gear to do so, and that happens quite a bit.

Edit: Some people just have bad decision making skills, really not disagreeing with you, was just pointing out that the east does not lack those types of dangers in certain areas.
 

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Next time you're at a random gathering of people, ask them all to point towards North. :blink: You'd be surprised! I'm surprised how many people don't know their bearings...
Guilty! My brain just doesn't work that way, I suppose. But it also means I am extra-careful out there and maps are my friends in any situation. I am way better at finding my way around a city than around a wilderness and that's probably because I don't go to the wilderness much (at all).

Heck I even get lost in video games! It's hilarious, really.
 

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Yeah as an outdoorsman all of my life, I just cant wrap my head around how a person can actually get lost. I have certainly "lost" a trial, picked a wrong canyon or ridge, or missed a target when dead reckoning, but always easily retraced my steps to find the right path. To get so dissoriented as to not even be able to retrace your steps and return to last know position just baffles me; even without map and compass, I just dont understand how people can get this dissoriented.
I worked with this one chick, who was smart as hell, high achiever, going to MBA and Law School, yada yada yada,

could tell North if you pointed it out to her 10 seconds earlier. I have the best sense of direction in my group so everyone relies on me anywhere we go. So I can't figure it out either, but I've seen it.
 

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Yeah as an outdoorsman all of my life, I just cant wrap my head around how a person can actually get lost. I have certainly "lost" a trial, picked a wrong canyon or ridge, or missed a target when dead reckoning, but always easily retraced my steps to find the right path. To get so dissoriented as to not even be able to retrace your steps and return to last know position just baffles me; even without map and compass, I just dont understand how people can get this dissoriented.
While I agree that people shouldn't be entering terrain they can't handle, I can understand the disorientation. It depends on visibility of distinct features. In whiteout conditions, it's obviously pretty easy to get turned around. Even in non-white conditions, if you are on level ground, especially in the middle of the forest, I find it really easy to get disoriented. I've spent a recent weekend running around the forest with a compass, map, and friend. There were a number of times I thought I was walking 'straight' only to look at my compass and realize I was moving totally in the wrong direction. And yes, I probably could've turned around and figured out how to backtrack a couple hundred feet from memory, but any more than that and the trees all start to look the same.
 

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Next time you're at a random gathering of people, ask them all to point towards North. :blink: You'd be surprised! I'm surprised how many people don't know their bearings...
hmmm, does knowing the "tricks" of finding north count? :eusa_clap:

if you spun me around at random, held a gun to my head, and told me to point north or you'll kill me, i'd be fucked. but if you give me a few minutes to go through my mental checklist of ways i can figure it out, i might be okay.

if it doesn't count, how does one go about just "knowing" where north is?
 

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if it doesn't count, how does one go about just "knowing" where north is?
I think I just always know?!? It probably helps that I'm the one driving 95% of the time, and I use north-south-east-west when driving instead of left and rights...

In your hometown, typical workplace, home, etc. I would expect it, but some people just don't know I guess? I'm sure it's possible to go through life never really knowing compass directions, but it's just so much easier!
 
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