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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Dear Dudes & Dudettes,

Trying to understand base bevel here (no not edge bevel, just the base bevel). Google and Youtube informs me a higher degree of base bevel will cause the edge to grip later, thus creating a more forgiving ride. Sounds reasonable.

My question is then, all other things being equal, since rider > board, will I as a beginner feel any difference between the boards? Will I feel any difference once I advance to intermediate level?

The reason I'm asking is because I can get an unused 2012 Raygun cheaper than a 2013 or 2014, and the only (apparent) difference is the base bevel: 3 degrees for 2012 and 1 degree for the later models. Use will be all-mountain, snow will mostly be hard and/or slushy and/or chopped up.

Thank you.
 

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-3 degrees will help stop you from catching an edge, go for it. In a few years you will probably look for more grip from your edge.
I like mine at 0 and 88 so they really bite in but that would be a disaster for a beginner
 

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The 2012 model will be much more forgiving to learn on. You will get a lot of great years out of the board. The best part is that as you get better you can change the bevel of the board. Every time a board is run over a stone the bevel has to be reset. So ride it, enjoy it and when it needs an edge sharpening in the future talk with the tech about what bevel you should ride for your ability level.
 

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In my first couple of years snowboarding, I had a Morrow Lithium, a K2 Brigade, a Ride Havoc, and a Never Summer Heritage to play on (at various times). The different boards felt different, rode different, had different amounts of forgiveness and/or squirreliness. When we say Rider > Board we mean that getting a new board won't make you suddenly able to huck 10s off a 40-footer. But different equipment does feel different, behave different, and does affect your riding. If you're a noob, bad equipment can limit you as well. A really experienced rider can staple a piece of plywood to their high tops and make it work, but they'd still do better on a good deck.
 

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yes donutz :eusa_clap:

i'm still a beginner myself, and agree with this. a certain board helped me pick up things very fast, and i think i owe that board for a lot of my progress...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks a lot ppl, greatly appreciated. Some follow-up:

The best part is that as you get better you can change the bevel of the board. Every time a board is run over a stone the bevel has to be reset. So ride it, enjoy it and when it needs an edge sharpening in the future talk with the tech about what bevel you should ride for your ability level.
But as I've understood it you can only add angle, never reduce. Or is that only for edge bevel, not base bevel?

In my first couple of years snowboarding, I had a Morrow Lithium, a K2 Brigade, a Ride Havoc, and a Never Summer Heritage to play on (at various times). The different boards felt different, rode different, had different amounts of forgiveness and/or squirreliness. When we say Rider > Board we mean that getting a new board won't make you suddenly able to huck 10s off a 40-footer. But different equipment does feel different, behave different, and does affect your riding. If you're a noob, bad equipment can limit you as well. A really experienced rider can staple a piece of plywood to their high tops and make it work, but they'd still do better on a good deck.
Of course. I would never dream of jumping onto a Custom X or a Man's Board for example (still dreaming of a BSOD though but I'm not ready to die yet). But in the end I'm starting to ask those question that are in the form: "Will a difference of x amount of factor y make any difference for a n00b like me - really?"

They say you shouldn't overthink your board purchase but I've already done that by far so I might as well do it even more. ^^ A total of 11 days on the slopes and I'm already completely absorbed by these thoughts. Ahh the lifestyle. Should have started when I was 18 and not 38...
 

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The Swiss Miss
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In my first couple of years snowboarding, I had a Morrow Lithium, a K2 Brigade, a Ride Havoc, and a Never Summer Heritage to play on (at various times). The different boards felt different, rode different, had different amounts of forgiveness and/or squirreliness. When we say Rider > Board we mean that getting a new board won't make you suddenly able to huck 10s off a 40-footer. But different equipment does feel different, behave different, and does affect your riding.

:thumbsup:
How I ride depends a lot on the board. I can make it down the mountain on every deck, but how confident I feel depends on how board reacts. If the board isn't stable at speed, my rabbit heart wins, no aggressive riding possible. Give me my long stiff camber and I'll bomb, give me a short rocker and I'll be a traffic block cos I loose confidence.
 

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In my first couple of years snowboarding, I had a Morrow Lithium, a K2 Brigade, a Ride Havoc, and a Never Summer Heritage to play on (at various times). The different boards felt different, rode different, had different amounts of forgiveness and/or squirreliness. When we say Rider > Board we mean that getting a new board won't make you suddenly able to huck 10s off a 40-footer. But different equipment does feel different, behave different, and does affect your riding. If you're a noob, bad equipment can limit you as well. A really experienced rider can staple a piece of plywood to their high tops and make it work, but they'd still do better on a good deck.
The funny thing is, it's true.:icon_scratch:

Some guys could staple plywood to their hightops & still ride circles around most people:giggle:

I used to tell people I could ride a 2x6, then I saw the vid of people riding 2x6's. I knew it could be done.:thumbsup:

More than a handful of times, I've offered up my board to someone who had just snapped theirs. So we both could get back down to the bottom faster.

I kinda want to try hard boots too, can't see why I couldn't ride one of those just fine right out of the gate?

I love cranking out the hardest carves I can.
Going from an almost weightless feeling, then a split second later, the G forces of super hard carve. I think it just moved:unsure::giggle:

I have no doubt, I could cut someone in half, with the trench I can leave.:eusa_clap:

& I'm not saying, only I can:huh:. Lots of us can.:yahoo:


Anticrobotic, you could ride a Custom X just fine. You want a BSOD, go get one.

Just be prepared to start going a lot faster than you used to. It's inevitable:D



TT







TT
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You want a BSOD, go get one.
Nah, I think I'll skip the part with constantly catching an edge at high speed and eating shit. It happens enough at low speed with my Burton Blunt as it is. That's the sad truth.
 

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Thanks a lot ppl, greatly appreciated. Some follow-up:
But as I've understood it you can only add angle, never reduce. Or is that only for edge bevel, not base bevel?
You can always reduce or add angle, base and edge. The problem being that each time you change bevel you are reducing the life of the snowboard. In your case the 3 degree bevel is perfect for the rider you are now. Each time you ride the board you cause wear and tear to the base and edge. The board will eventually need a full tune up, probabaly around the time you will be ready for more performance. When a tech grinds the base of a board they usually take the the board to the point where sparks are flying. Think of those sparks as your bevel. The base grind naturally puts the edge bevel back at 0 degrees. The tech then puts bevel back into the base edge when they sharpen it.

Since you are removing material each time you do this to a board, there is a limit to how many times you can get a board ground before it's dead. The average board is retired LONG before they get to this point. Not something you need to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The board will eventually need a full tune up, probabaly around the time you will be ready for more performance. [---] The base grind naturally puts the edge bevel back at 0 degrees. The tech then puts bevel back into the base edge when they sharpen it.
Oh right, tuning. Got it. :thumbsup:
 
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