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Discussion Starter #1
Long story short, someone hit the nose of my snowboard and the top sheet was damaged. I don't think the core is exposed but I can see the fiberglass part. I am wondering if I should repair this with epoxy, which I found is what most people used to fixed the top sheet of the board. Or maybe this damage is not too bad that I can let it be and keep using the board without issues.

I appreciate anyone that provides suggestions on this. Thank you!

The photos of the damaged parts are attached.
 

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Doesn't look too bad. But nothing good can come out of water possibly getting under the top sheet so I would file/sand down the damaged area and seal with marine epoxy. Do not use hard curing epoxy.
 

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Long story short, someone hit the nose of my snowboard and the top sheet was damaged.
You're absolutely okay but if you're concerned... read below;)

But nothing good can come out of water possibly getting under the top sheet so I would file/sand down the damaged area and seal with marine epoxy. Do not use hard curing epoxy.
^This right here^. Get rid of sharp pieces, burrs, etc. and press loose edges with cold temp epoxy(ie marine epoxy). Do that and you're golden!

Cheers, Buddy(y)

Edit : Add a Husky clamp to your repair arsenal for future events, like so --> Husky 8 in. Drop Forged C-Clamp-97895 - The Home Depot

The larger ones aren't necessary unless you press on an exceptionally large bench(Which would be weird in this case). Use saw horses, a table or a couch for this round
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doesn't look too bad. But nothing good can come out of water possibly getting under the top sheet so I would file/sand down the damaged area and seal with marine epoxy. Do not use hard curing epoxy.
Thank you for the suggestion!

I just realized I might have most of the tools I need except the epoxy. I am thinking about applying epoxy into the cracks and the peeled part and tried to use two wood plates with clamps to fix it for 24 hr. I will Maybe use the razor and the sandpaper to remove excess epoxy. I hope that makes sense. Do you have any suggested marine epoxy I should buy? Or if most of the marine epoxy will work?
 

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Thank you for the suggestion!

I just realized I might have most of the tools I need except the epoxy. I am thinking about applying epoxy into the cracks and the peeled part and tried to use two wood plates with clamps to fix it for 24 hr. I will Maybe use the razor and the sandpaper to remove excess epoxy. I hope that makes sense. Do you have any suggested marine epoxy I should buy? Or if most of the marine epoxy will work?
Judging by the low volume work you need done try this :
 

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If you can get your hands on a shred of fiberglass cloth, it wouldn't hurt to epoxy that on the spot. Adds some stability and protection.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you can get your hands on a shred of fiberglass cloth, it wouldn't hurt to epoxy that on the spot. Adds some stability and protection.
I think this is actually a good idea, however, I am not sure what the best procedure would be. I have two ways in mind.

First method:
1. Apply the first layer of epoxy to fill the hole and wait until it is cured
2. Put the cloth on top and apply epoxy and again wait until it is cured

Second method:
1. Apply the first layer of epoxy
2. Put the cloth on top and then clamp it with some flat plate
3. Wait until the resin is cured.

Also I am not sure if the marine epoxy will stick to the fiberglass I am going to buy (I think it should)
The link is here:https://www.amazon.com/Bondo-20128-...=Bondo+Fiberglass+Resin&qid=1617146615&sr=8-7

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Second method:
1. Apply the first layer of epoxy
2. Put the cloth on top and then clamp it with some flat plate
3. Wait until the resin is cured.

Also I am not sure if the marine epoxy will stick to the fiberglass I am going to buy (I think it should)
The link is here:https://www.amazon.com/Bondo-20128-...=Bondo+Fiberglass+Resin&qid=1617146615&sr=8-7

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
"SURFACE APPLICATIONS: Aluminum, Fiberglass, Metal, Plastic/Composite, Wood."

It'll work 👌 . Just make sure to apply the epoxy between both the core & fiberglass and the fiberglass & topsheet

Also, it makes most sense to do a simple cover job for your core rather than worrying about adding too much. It's on your nose and so minimal it prob wont matter. It's mostly for protecting the wood from moisture.
 

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Third method, which was what I did:
1. Apply the first layer of epoxy, let cure but not fully.
2. Put fiberglass cloth on top, saturate with epoxy, let cure fully.
3. Add 2-3 more coats of epoxy to fill the weave of the cloth.
4. Sand lightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Third method, which was what I did:
1. Apply the first layer of epoxy, let cure but not fully.
2. Put fiberglass cloth on top, saturate with epoxy, let cure fully.
3. Add 2-3 more coats of epoxy to fill the weave of the cloth.
4. Sand lightly.
Would you suggest clamping when doing the first layer to ensure a flat surface? Sorry I am quite worried if I will fuck up my board, though I think this should go well. I just want to make sure I do it right :\ I am planning to do this on the weekends and maybe film a video of it. If this goes well then other people that run into the same problems may have some video reference :)
 

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personally, i wouldn't worry about fiberglassing that. make sure there is nothing in the damaged area & that it is completely dry (incase snow got in it). decide how to clamp before epoxying, then add epoxy, clamp, let cure. clean up excess epoxy after it is fully cured. make sure the epoxy you use can hold up in cold temps, is waterproof & has a high peel strength.
I know my reply is kinda vague, but mix it in with some of the other replies & you should be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for everyone's input! Eventually, I decided to directly apply epoxy to the crack after removing dangling pieces with files and razors. I did not clamp since I planned to simply sand the excessive resin tomorrow when it is cured. I also did not use fiberglass since the damaged part is quite small. I might consider it in the future if something worse happens :) Hopefully, the cured epoxy will look not too bad on my board!
 

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Thanks for everyone's input! Eventually, I decided to directly apply epoxy to the crack after removing dangling pieces with files and razors. I did not clamp since I planned to simply sand the excessive resin tomorrow when it is cured. I also did not use fiberglass since the damaged part is quite small. I might consider it in the future if something worse happens :) Hopefully, the cured epoxy will look not too bad on my board!
TBF, fiberglass would've been overkill. Let us know how it looks after you sand it down. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cured epoxy looks okay. I borrowed a Dremel tool to remove some excessive epoxy that sticks to the edge. I think the smaller dint looks okay.

I messed up a bit when using the tool on the bigger damaged area on the nose. The screw on the tool suddenly moves forward so I accidentally expose part of the part fiberglass part. I think overall at least all the damaged region is well sealed up by the epoxy. I guess I am going to apply another thin layer later and get some sandpaper with different grits to make it looks better.

Thanks again for all the help!
 

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It’s always nice to have a small repair as your first repair. Looks good. Just hand sand the second coat. Around the metal edge I have found that a small wood chisel is good for shaving the excess glue off.
 
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