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If you wouldn't mind giving me one more bit of advice. I'm a little conflicted on where to mask off the damage. I initially had the entire area masked off, just beyond where you see the top sheet begin to depress outward towards the edge. It's the white line like impression around that entire area. I basically laid down masking tape at that white line. So I'd be laying down epoxy over my original top sheet as well as the exposed fiberglass. Now I'm thinking not to mask off so far from the exposed fiberglass, and just mask off the two small areas around the exposed fiberglass and make the patch level with the impressed top sheet. What would you suggest is the best area to mask this off? Thanks so much.
You have to lightly sand the untouched/undamaged top sheet for the new resin to stick on top. So just mask past the smashed up edge so you will have new resin going on top. You will bring this raised repair line back down to the original topsheet height when you sand back. I laid tape over mind but this may be hard with your damage as it's over a wider area and you may upset the height level too low. What ever you can do to get this repair line flat to the topsheet and prevent sanding is good though. When you sand with wet 800 it cuts in fairly good. You don't need much time on the sander only a few seconds to blend it in between each grade. The 800 should bring it down to the right height while the 1200 and 2000 will polish the scratches out. The polish pad will then make all the scratches disappear completely.
 

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Great. Thanks for the advice. I'll post pics once I'm finished.
I've got a Metabo 18V cordless drill with side handle which helps to counter the weight of the drill down on the job. I've got a variety of smaller air tools but the velcro pad shaft was too big for them. When I was in the fibreglass industry we use a disk sander/polisher with a large pad which gives you so much control over the balance of the tool and this prevents the danger in sanding too deep. If you do this it just means you will have to refill back up with a little resin to lift up the topsheet layer again. You won't need much speed from the drill, keep the sand wet as you are working on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Sorry for the belated reply. I was out of town and the materials for the repair didn't arrive before I left so I couldn't get started until yesterday. I finished the repair, and in my opinion it turned out way above my initial expectations. I think I even got the color close enough to the original so that the repair area wouldn't stand out. My steps were as follows:

1: I masked off the area and the side edge with painters tape, encompassing the entire area.
2: 1:1 G650 epoxy plus a single drop of black anilide epoxy dye - stuff is as black as a black hole. The color was pretty close and I couldn't get it any closer to the original.
3: Used a flat edge to smear on the black epoxy, covering the entire area.
4: Let the epoxy cure for 2 hrs - just until it gelled -, then carefully pulled off the masking tape.
5: Let the epoxy fully cure for 24+ hours.
6: Masked the epoxied area.
7: Using 240 grit sandpaper, sanded the side edge just to remove any epoxy that seeped through onto the sidewall. Just a one or two light passes did the trick.
8: Used the 240 grit sandpaper to sand the entire epoxied area down to the level of the original top sheet.
9: Removed mask and made sure it was smooth with the original top sheet then re-masked the area again with masking tape.
10: Used the 3M Headlight restoration kit:
11: -500 grit pad on the drill attachment and sanded the entire area for a good 15 to 20 seconds.
12: -800 grit pad on the drill attachment - wetted the area and the 800 pad - and sanded/polished for a good 20 - 30 seconds.
13: -3000 grit pad on the drill attachment - wet the area and the pad - - and sanded/polished for a good 20 - 30 seconds.
14: -attached the supplied foam polishing pad and a dime-sized amount of supplied polish and buffed the area for a good 30 - 45 secs or until I saw no more polish and the area took on a mirror polish.

I probably didn't need to keep re-masking off the area, but i wanted to keep checking my work. The resultant layer of epoxy ended up being no more than a mm thick at most which made it a challenge to gauge when sanding - you can even see from the pictures below that I accidentally went too far with the 500 grit on the drill pad - I sanded through a very small bit of epoxy on the edge of the repair. All in all, I think for the first time doing this, the results were exceptional and definitely exceeded my expectations. Below are a bunch of pics of the process. I can't thank everybody enough who chipped in with some awesome advice about how to go about cleaning up this top sheet dmg.

https://i.imgur.com/x6VSy5X.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/sWpFZG5.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/YokVskh.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/DqKJYnj.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/S4DXehp.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/tA02RQ2.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/YEMT4O1.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/K96WmbN.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/mqd6nHr.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/OdlL1Kt.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/laSMZ33.jpg
 

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Got back from a week at Perisher the other day and some clown on rental skis ran over the back of my Custom in the Leichhardt lift line. As a result a tiny chip occurred in the right side topsheet edge on the tail. So I'll show the how I did this repair with a little improved technique. This repair was pretty quick to do.

So 3 1/2 decades ago I worked in surfboard manufacturing just out of school for a few years. Here I was able to develop some tradie skills in the bank in order to work fairly competently with fibreglass/repairs etc.

Now the Snowboard Industry as a whole are steering towards more "Greener" fabricating processes and moving away from using higher toxic polished topsheets (Which are so much easier to repair and blend in). They now prefer having more environmental friendly satin/matte topsheet finishes on their snowboards. Now the satin/matte finishes are a little harder to blend in with a pad and I find with some boards ie Libtech, the topsheet design is so very close to the surface that the slightest touch with a micro grade sanding pad eats this away.

These photos were taken after I had done the repair to just go through the process with you. The bamboo mixing stick is just used to help my S8 focus in really close.


20200915_083656.jpg



Delicately clean out the chip with razor. Precisely tape up around the chip topsheet and edge area to be repaired.


20200915_083928.jpg



In the past I use to just mask over the area to flatten the epoxy down but the adhesive on the tape left a rough texture on the set epoxy that had to be sanded smooth. What I do now is lay a strip of clear tape (adhesive sides together) on the masking tape the exact size of the repair which will give me a preset smooth finish on the fill in.


20200915_084004.jpg


Tape up over the epoxy and stick down to a flat level. Allow epoxy to set for 24 hours so it is not "gelly" when you remove the tape.

20200915_083333.jpg


You will just have to slightly sand the edges as the epoxy will squeeze out to the side. Blend in the top sheet edge angle with 240 grit to match in the profile. Don't touch the topsheet with the sandpaper. Smooth out edge with wet 600 grit and polish with wax to finish.

20200915_083408.jpg


You will not have to do in top sheet sanding as the epoxy will be finished in a satin look laying directly flat on your board.

You can prior colour match in the top sheet to blend in but as the topsheet design is a thin layer sheet you will have to be precise with the paint as you will see any overflowing down the edges and this will require sanding out with a razor/paper to make it aesthetically look sweet.

At distance of a few feet this repair is hardly noticeable.
 
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