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I'm in the market for a new all-mountain board. Doing a google search for recommendations returns many results for "Top 10/15/20 etc. All Mountain Snowboards" from various sources. There seems to be little overlap from each and the end result is a plethora of boards; it's overwhelming. I am referring to Snow Magazine, Switchback Travel, Outdoor Gear Lab, Tactics, Snowboarding Profiles, and Whitelines. Any comments on which of these sites has reliable, unbiased reviews?

I am 40 years old, been riding since I was 15, about 3 to 5 times a year. I grew up in the Northeast and now live in Southeast PA. I've been out west once and rode in the Italian Alps last winter. My skill level is on the higher end of intermediate. I've always ridden cambered boards until last winter in Italy where I rented a CRC. I used to spend time in the park when I was younger but now it's really minimal. I will do the occasional small jump or box and hit some kickers on a trail, but for the most part I like to cruise the mountain.

I'm 5'-11', 160 lb, shoe size/boot size 10.5 (Burton Imperial). I have a 2013 Rome Anthem with Rome Targa bindings, 159 cm. I have come to realize that this board and binding are too stiff for me and the full camber too unforgiving. This board wants to go faster than I do so I often get fatigued fighting it. Usually takes a shot of whiskey to get me charging on this thing. I can ride it decently but do sometimes catch an edge. I am especially apprehensive doing toe side turns on a steep slope with bumpy hard pack. Getting back to heel side is where I've had issues.

In Italy I rented a Nitro Gullwing. It felt loose at first but toward the end of the day I was much more comfortable. So now I am looking for something with a mid flex and hybrid camber, either RCR or CRC. I might even go with the Nitro. Any suggestions on which sites above I should trust or specific board suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

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I'd stick with RCR if you've liked camber all these years. All-mountain is a crowded category. It's best to really define the riding you want to do and the terrain you do it on to narrow down the search. Do you ride switch much? If not, maybe try something more directional. If so, look for more twin shapes.
 

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The tips on CRC is camber, so they usually behave similar to camber, just more forgiving. RCR might be more of a transition, but it's the most easy to ride in uneven terrain. You might feel that it lacks in pop and turning at first, till you get used to it. Both profiles have a wide range of uses, but CRC is more all mountain than fully park or freeride, in general.
 

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I say forget a new board. Just go for two shots of whiskey and you'll rock that shit.
This. Preferably a couple of bombardinos though.

Your problems are mostly technique, getting a board that's easier to ride is just going to mask the issue rather than solve it.

Get a lesson and/or read some of the many technique posts on here.
 

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I also had an older Rome Anthem with loads of camber, and same as you it was only happy when going full speed. Was also not great in powder.

Now I ride camrock boards RCR, and like them. Better in powder, more forgiving, but still rides similar to camber.

You could also go for a modern camber board, but depends on type of riding you want to do

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

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This. Preferably a couple of bombardinos though.

Your problems are mostly technique, getting a board that's easier to ride is just going to mask the issue rather than solve it.

Get a lesson and/or read some of the many technique posts on here.
I don't get this at all... why not get a board that fits what he wants? I don't see any reason having a board that is too hard to ride for him.

In Italy I rented a Nitro Gullwing. It felt loose at first but toward the end of the day I was much more comfortable. So now I am looking for something with a mid flex and hybrid camber, either RCR or CRC. I might even go with the Nitro. Any suggestions on which sites above I should trust or specific board suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

I'm an intermediate rider and I've enjoyed the Salomon First Call and the Nitro SMP for more forgiving and relaxed riding.

Angrysnowboarder, Agnarchy and Snowboarding Profiles seem to do good reviews. Check out those. The Rome Ravine gets good reviews at Angrysnowboarder.
 

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I don't get this at all... why not get a board that fits what he wants? I don't see any reason having a board that is too hard to ride for him.
I'm not saying don't buy another board, what I'm saying is there's something up with his technique. An upper intermediate with that much experience shouldn't be catching edges. I don't care what board you're on.
 

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For me getting a new board that fit me better meant (Rossi RCR) I was able to work on improving my technique versus fighting the board. And I actually went to intermediate/expert board and became much better rider. It is stable and I can carve it. And still working on improvement. My other board just was not good, (read angrysnowboarder review and it didnt get a happy review), especially not good at level I was at).
 

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I'm in the market for a new all-mountain board. Doing a google search for recommendations returns many results for "Top 10/15/20 etc. All Mountain Snowboards" from various sources. There seems to be little overlap from each and the end result is a plethora of boards; it's overwhelming. I am referring to Snow Magazine, Switchback Travel, Outdoor Gear Lab, Tactics, Snowboarding Profiles, and Whitelines. Any comments on which of these sites has reliable, unbiased reviews?

I am 40 years old, been riding since I was 15, about 3 to 5 times a year. I grew up in the Northeast and now live in Southeast PA. I've been out west once and rode in the Italian Alps last winter. My skill level is on the higher end of intermediate. I've always ridden cambered boards until last winter in Italy where I rented a CRC. I used to spend time in the park when I was younger but now it's really minimal. I will do the occasional small jump or box and hit some kickers on a trail, but for the most part I like to cruise the mountain.

I'm 5'-11', 160 lb, shoe size/boot size 10.5 (Burton Imperial). I have a 2013 Rome Anthem with Rome Targa bindings, 159 cm. I have come to realize that this board and binding are too stiff for me and the full camber too unforgiving. This board wants to go faster than I do so I often get fatigued fighting it. Usually takes a shot of whiskey to get me charging on this thing. I can ride it decently but do sometimes catch an edge. I am especially apprehensive doing toe side turns on a steep slope with bumpy hard pack. Getting back to heel side is where I've had issues.

In Italy I rented a Nitro Gullwing. It felt loose at first but toward the end of the day I was much more comfortable. So now I am looking for something with a mid flex and hybrid camber, either RCR or CRC. I might even go with the Nitro. Any suggestions on which sites above I should trust or specific board suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
I'm pretty much in the exact same position. Similar age (45 here) and experience, same needs regaridng a new board (all mntn), same sizing profile (178cm/73kg/10.5) and like you overwhelmed by the information out there in reviews.

I like what I've read around the NS Proto Type 2, Yes Greats and Capita Mercury/Assymulator boards, haven't ridden any of these so would welcome any feedback on these boards for what we are looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I say forget a new board. Just go for two shots of whiskey and you'll rock that shit.
Hell yeah. Screw it, give me some weed and send me to the Olympics.

Your problems are mostly technique, getting a board that's easier to ride is just going to mask the issue rather than solve it.

Get a lesson and/or read some of the many technique posts on here.
I would love to take a lesson, but whiskey is cheaper. To clarify my experience, I took about a 7 year hiatus starting in college and I've ridden 5 times max in a season. There are definitely seasons where I have literally gone out once. My progress has occurred in spurts. I'm sure my technique could use improvement but it's not like I'm catching edges left and right. Over the last decade or so I have actually caught my edge and fallen just a few times, generally on a very difficult run. Also I don't think the Anthem is made for navigating big ass moguls on steep trails and is not easy to make quick, tight turns on narrow and windy tree runs, which I tend to do a decent amount (my wife is a skier). The Anthem is made for half pipe, big jumps, and bombing the mountain like you don't give an F. Nope, nope, and nope.

I also didn't mention that a couple years ago I purchased an older Ride Kink (got a great deal), which is basically the opposite of the Anthem. It's flat and super flexible. I have zero problem controlling the board but it feels like a wet noodle. So when I rode the Nitro Gullwing last winter I knew I found my sweet spot. Like I mentioned above, by the end of the day I felt really comfortable. Had a lot of fun on that board.

I am of the same logic as J. Crew that improving my technique would be best done on a more forgiving board. I'm entirely sure that just about any board with a medium flex would be much easier for me to turn and suit my needs. Add to that some hybrid camber tech and even better.

Angrysnowboarder, Agnarchy and Snowboarding Profiles seem to do good reviews. Check out those. The Rome Ravine gets good reviews at Angrysnowboarder.
Thanks, I will check those out.

I'd watch a ton of angry youtubes get a feel and demo...

Or just get a party board.
Haha, what's a party board?
 

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I don't know the Anthem but it sounds as if it has too much torsional stiffness for how you like to ride.

For moguls, bumps, navigating narrow winding trees, I think you're on the right path looking at CRC boards. As you don't ride often, and thus loose memory between outings/seasons, IMO it's a good decision to look for a forgiving board which makes you enjoy your rare days out from the first second.
I don't know Nitro boards, can't comment on them. Only CRC boards I know are from Never Summer (I only recently got converted from being a longtime camber rider to ride CRC, too; in my case NS Proto Type Two, Maverix and Lady West) and like them especially for what you the dampening and nimbleness in bumpy moguled out terrain. They are catch-free and turn on a dime.

I still have my aggressive stiff camber boards for certain days, but all in all, most of the days, I take the NS CRC board out for riding. Easier on my knees :)

Considering review sites... all reviews will always be biased to some extent :). They are biased by the boards/brands the reviewers get, and the terrain they ride, the style they ride. Thus, reviews can only get you an idea. The best reviewer will be you. Go out and demo boards. If you don't find demo days, ask a local shop if you can demo-rent one. Try the boards of your friends, or ask the guy on the chair next to you if he would mind to swap boards and offer him a beer.
 
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