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So what determines if something is collectible? Simple: if there's a demand for it and people are willing to pay, it's a collectible. Remember when comics were being sold as collectibles? Everyone was buying them in anticipation of selling them for massive bucks. Result? A whole lot of inventory on the market that no one wanted because everyone already had one. The second thing is that there has to be a tendency to collect them. For instance, weird Trek or Star Wars paraphernalia. There are lots of people who collect those, so lots of demand. Having a signature of some kind on it helps, too. Of course the signature by definition makes it rare, unless the signer was producing the items factory-style.

So it has to be rare, and it has to fit into one of the collector markets. I think the real problem with snowboards is that there is no real collector's market. Some individual might want a specific board for reasons of nostalgia and be willing to pay a little extra for it, but not enough to make a huge difference. If you look at collectible sports stuff in general, it's all signed by some famous sports star or known to have belonged to them.
Snowboards by design as well as the riders that rode them is all part of "Snowboarding History". Their worth is determined by what design elements (including substrates and materials) evolved from them as well as the riding styles and techniques (tricks) of them that rode them. As previously mentioned, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". If you lean towards the style of a certain pro, then the board brand he rode will be desirable. Hence : Pro Models. A guy who has been totally immersed and obsessed in snowboarding from the beginning is Bryan Sutherland at www.oldsnowboards.com . If anyone can give you a true value of a snowboard's worth, it's Bryan, and he's an amazing rider as well.
 
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