Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I really want a wax that will keep my board from getting "stuck" in spring slush and will last at least a full day of riding. My all-temp wax just isn't cutting it, and after a few runs I am not able to pick up enough speed to hit kickers.

I've heard sooo many different things from various resort shop employees. One said I need flourinated wax, one said graphite wax, and the other said no wax at all. Some forum members have said to use some other sort of additive to my wax. So whats the word?

I just bought some of this stuff online and am waiting for it... is this the best I can do? Plz recommend something so I can order it online soon, I'm going to Mammoth in a week!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
You can get a shop to grind grooves into your base, this is called structuring. The grooves channel water along the boards length. It helps a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
I really want a wax that will keep my board from getting "stuck" in spring slush and will last at least a full day of riding. My all-temp wax just isn't cutting it, and after a few runs I am not able to pick up enough speed to hit kickers.

I've heard sooo many different things from various resort shop employees. One said I need flourinated wax, one said graphite wax, and the other said no wax at all. Some forum members have said to use some other sort of additive to my wax. So whats the word?

I just bought some of this stuff online and am waiting for it... is this the best I can do? Plz recommend something so I can order it online soon, I'm going to Mammoth in a week!
No.

The rub-on wax isn't going to last. Read:
http://www.snowboardingforum.com/boards/7010-guides-waxing-tuning-board-repair.html] Guides to Waxing, Tuning and Board Repair.
which leads to:
Waxing a snowboard: How you legitimately get wax into a board... and what's a bunch of BS:

So, the next thing to understand is WHY you hotwax a snowboard. The reason is simple actually. A base, is a porous material. It becomes exceptionally porous when heated, because the molecules expand. At this point, the liquid heated wax is free to flow inbetween the expanded molecules of the base, and thereby the base ABSORBS the wax. When the base cools it settles, and retains the wax inside of it.

WAX IS NOT A LAYER ONTOP OF YOUR BASE, IT IS IN YOUR BASE!


When it comes to waxing, considering what wax to get is a big factor. While most the marketing involved with waxes (One Ball Jay's hype) are largely over rated, there are some legitimate things to consider. One of which is temperature. For the most part you can get away with all temperature wax on any given day. However, to really be fast a wax aimed for the general temperature range in which you will operate is best. As a lot of us can't wax slope side however, I won't go into much detail here. Get a nice all temperature wax.

Rub on wax is a silly concept. You're trying to forcefully jam SOLID molecules of wax, through solid molecules of base. You've got three chances of actually accomplishing this: A fat chance, a slim chance, and no chance. You might get some wax slightly in there, but it'll last all of twenty minutes. It's a scam for lazy people. Stop believing it okay? It will increase how slippery your riding surface is however, so there is that benefit. It serves a minimal gain at your contact points. Rub on liquid waxes, along with rain-x and all those other stupid ideas are silly as well. They come out of the board just as easily as they go onto the board... durrrrrrr
SOme more info on Structure, as Lamps pointed out:
http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning-tips.ski-base-structure
Which wax then?

I like Fluorinated waxes on warm snow... late in the season, the snow would probably be dirty, so graphite or molybdenum (which I heard is better & faster than graphite) would also be a good additive to consider.

ONE BALL JAY HYDRO WAX- COOL 150g

then drip on a warm temp wax, and do a proper hot wax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
For Spring, just get one of the various warm weather waxes, typically red in color. They are super easy to scrape as well and will help quite a bit in spring conditions. There are a bunch of guides here in this subforum that will help with waxing, structuring, etc. as well. Have fun in Mammoth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
that stuff will work good if you get stuck up on the hill, but like others have said you wanna get a good warm weather hot wax on there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,298 Posts
Yeh, nice thick coat of red, ironed smooth...I sometimes don't even scrape, the ruff snow or corn will do that for ya in the first 100 yards anyway
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Spring waxing is kind of a bitch if you ride for any length of time. In my experience, most all warm temp waxes will last about 2-3 hours in corn snow, and then you're stripped down to a dry ass base for the rest of the day.

I've been using Hertel's race wax for spring riding, and while it doesn't feel quite as good as a temp specific wax, it actually lasts more than a single day's worth in riding. Whatever Hertel does to their wax makes it crazy, crazy durable, you can tell immediately when you start waxing that it's much harder than standard hydro waxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
I really want a wax that will keep my board from getting "stuck" in spring slush and will last at least a full day of riding. My all-temp wax just isn't cutting it, and after a few runs I am not able to pick up enough speed to hit kickers.

I've heard sooo many different things from various resort shop employees. One said I need flourinated wax, one said graphite wax, and the other said no wax at all. Some forum members have said to use some other sort of additive to my wax. So whats the word?

I just bought some of this stuff online and am waiting for it... is this the best I can do? Plz recommend something so I can order it online soon, I'm going to Mammoth in a week!
I just bought a Zardoz Notwax puck and some One Ball Jay black magic summer slush wax.

My buddy is going to Mammoth on Friday, and I'm going to do his board up (I may go Monday). It's 60F and slushy. I was there two weeks ago. Chair 9/Eagle Lodge gets real wet. It's like an old slurpee over there at the bottom.

Going to rub the Zardoz on, and then apply the wax and get it all mixed in good. I might rub another layer on top but we'll see. Stuff isn't too cheap :laugh:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Spring waxing is kind of a bitch if you ride for any length of time. In my experience, most all warm temp waxes will last about 2-3 hours in corn snow, and then you're stripped down to a dry ass base for the rest of the day.

I've been using Hertel's race wax for spring riding, and while it doesn't feel quite as good as a temp specific wax, it actually lasts more than a single day's worth in riding.
A reviewer on that site said that he still has problems with that wax rubbing off. What conditions are you riding in, and how many hours/day? The stuff seems pretty expensive for its weight.



Thx for all the suggestions everyone, I'm looking into each of them right now :)

How does this sound? May be a bit overkill, but I'm really looking for an all-day solution that won't be gone by halfway through a 6-8 hour day. Though I have a feeling that this will still be gone after like 4 hours...

- Clean my base
- Rub on some graphite additive
- Put some Zardoz Not-wax ontop of the graphite additive
- Drip on some warm temp wax
- Iron it all in
- Scrape
- Rub some more Zardoz on top
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Take you board to a shop that knows the conditions for your mountain for spring. Ask them to put a texture for spring conditions. And then get it waxed for warm snow. The right texture is as important as wax in slush and warm snow conditions. And last: Learn how to tune your own board. (Rub on waxes dont really count as tuning!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
A reviewer on that site said that he still has problems with that wax rubbing off. What conditions are you riding in, and how many hours/day? The stuff seems pretty expensive for its weight.
It can rub off early if you don't heat it up appropriately, it doesn't stay in liquid form at 120 degrees like most all temps do, I usually iron at about 140 to heat it up enough.

I ride open to close five days a week (resorts here are 9-4), and ride in rain, sun baked slush, refrozen corn, hail, or whatever else happens during the day. For reference, I've used swix CH8, F4, and universal, as well as a couple Toko variants, and oneballjay graphite in the spring, and none of it has ever lasted more than half a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
A reviewer on that site said that he still has problems with that wax rubbing off. What conditions are you riding in, and how many hours/day? The stuff seems pretty expensive for its weight.



Thx for all the suggestions everyone, I'm looking into each of them right now :)

How does this sound? May be a bit overkill, but I'm really looking for an all-day solution that won't be gone by halfway through a 6-8 hour day. Though I have a feeling that this will still be gone after like 4 hours...

- Clean my base
- Rub on some graphite additive
- Put some Zardoz Not-wax ontop of the graphite additive
- Drip on some warm temp wax
- Iron it all in
- Scrape
- Rub some more Zardoz on top
The most important step is missing - you need a base grind to add structure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I am kind of hesitant to get my base structured. It seems irreversible and I also read that there are conditions in which I would NOT want those grooves in my base. Can anybody elaborate on this?

Also, how will a structured base perform on boxes and rails?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
I suspect no difference on boxes and rails, not sure what conditions you would be better off without structure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
I am kind of hesitant to get my base structured. It seems irreversible and I also read that there are conditions in which I would NOT want those grooves in my base. Can anybody elaborate on this?

Also, how will a structured base perform on boxes and rails?
Your base already has some sort of structure ground from the factory. Grinding in another structure for different snow conditions... probably won't make a difference on boxes and rails.

Getting up to speed for each park feature, that's important, especially if you cannot get up to speed.

Changing structure means grinding bases, which since the base thin, you only have a few opportunities for grinding.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top