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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, been having a real hard time finding the right “do it all” board to buy. Me being almost 6’5” about 225lbs 11.5 shoe size I don’t know if I need a wide board or not. I’m in the east coast so we get very harsh conditions all winter from washy slush to straight ice.
I don’t do much park but love side hits and some jibbing and would definitely like a twin board. Also get into quite a bit of back country and powder riding.
I don’t want to buy multiple boards so I’m looking for the best “do it all” out there.
I’ve been looking at these: capita doa/super doa, Salomon huckknife, rossignol jibsaw, Rome mod
Not too worried about the price tag because I plan on riding this board for a few years.
please help!
 

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You don't do much park but you want a twin? Do you ride switch a significant amount of the time, and in demanding situations? Or is your switch riding just cruising on groomers?

I ask because outside of the park, a directional board has every advantage over a twin. The first board that came to mind was the Libtech Ejack Knife or Dynamo 162W. Slightly setback, slightly tapered, edge tech and camber for grip on ice, and they'll ride switch just fine. As above, I'd be looking for something camber or camrock with edgetech, directional twin or something with a slight set back and taper.
 

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I’m your exact specs, ride east coast and out west, my favorite rad dad board is my yes PYL 164w, with a 11.5 boot definitely recommend 264mm or wider deck so you don’t have to go extreme binding angles on old ass knees.

I don’t jib anymore so can’t speak to that but given what you said I’d buy the jones ultra mountain twin in a 165 wide. Gives you the twin with traction bumps for ice and stiffens the board while lightening it for thrashing around the mountain. 3d rockered nose for powder with great ease of turn imitation but camber between the feet for locked in carves with nice pop jetting out of turns.

Also the graphics this year are boss
 

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You could also look at the rome ravine or ejack knife. Definitely get the wide version if you go for the ejack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You don't do much park but you want a twin? Do you ride switch a significant amount of the time, and in demanding situations? Or is your switch riding just cruising on groomers?

I ask because outside of the park, a directional board has every advantage over a twin. The first board that came to mind was the Libtech Ejack Knife or Dynamo 162W. Slightly setback, slightly tapered, edge tech and camber for grip on ice, and they'll ride switch just fine. As above, I'd be looking for something camber or camrock with edgetech, directional twin or something with a slight set back and taper.
I do ride a lot of switch so I think I’d rather have switch. However I’ve honestly never been on a directional twin so I dont really know how it feels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’m your exact specs, ride east coast and out west, my favorite rad dad board is my yes PYL 164w, with a 11.5 boot definitely recommend 264mm or wider deck so you don’t have to go extreme binding angles on old ass knees.

I don’t jib anymore so can’t speak to that but given what you said I’d buy the jones ultra mountain twin in a 165 wide. Gives you the twin with traction bumps for ice and stiffens the board while lightening it for thrashing around the mountain. 3d rockered nose for powder with great ease of turn imitation but camber between the feet for locked in carves with nice pop jetting out of turns.

Also the graphics this year are boss
Wow LEGENDARY post man
thank you
I’ve been searching and searching and thats exactly what I’m looking for. Love every aspect of that board choice
 

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I do ride a lot of switch so I think I’d rather have switch. However I’ve honestly never been on a directional twin so I dont really know how it feels.
You can ride switch on any decent board. Riding fresh snow is easier with some taper, setback, and directional shape. Sure, you can ride a true twin in powder but you’ll be a lot happier when your nose stays above the snow. Yes PYL is directional and I think it also is setback and tapered.
 

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The "One Board does it all???" is a fantasy that is not really achievable. You want to cover a wide range of conditions to charging Ice Coast to Freeride/Powder. I would suggest a 2 board quiver. An all mountain directional cambered twin for Ice Coast and a Freeride board (directional/tapered/setback camber) for off piste/powdery conditions. The rewards you get out of this far exceed the $$$$ outlay. You can thank me later.

You 100% want a big board (length/width ie 102kg/US11.5), looking at 162W plus. The better the rider you are, the easier it is to handle a longer length. With your weight, it will be very easy to overpower a smaller board ie lose/slide the edge out due to the force you can apply. A longer/stiffer board will give you far far great stability at high speed. I'd be looking in the 165W park range. I'm in this same area and find that in Australia (imagine in the US of A as well) these boards are fortunately always the last to sell due to the smaller number of riders in this area so you can get some good EOS discounts on them. Sadly Snowboarding is an expensive activity but if you grab your hardware at the EOS you can do a 2 board quiver for the cost of practically 1 at full RRP.
 

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I do ride a lot of switch so I think I’d rather have switch. However I’ve honestly never been on a directional twin so I dont really know how it feels.
A directonal twin is just a board that is twin between the contacts but has a slightly longer nose forward of these contacts than the tail. This just gives you the ability to get lift in softer /powdery conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The "One Board does it all???" is a fantasy that is not really achievable. You want to cover a wide range of conditions to charging Ice Coast to Freeride/Powder. I would suggest a 2 board quiver. An all mountain directional cambered twin for Ice Coast and a Freeride board (directional/tapered/setback camber) for off piste/powdery conditions. The rewards you get out of this far exceed the $$$$ outlay. You can thank me later.

You 100% want a big board (length/width ie 102kg/US11.5), looking at 162W plus. The better the rider you are, the easier it is to handle a longer length. With your weight, it will be very easy to overpower a smaller board ie lose/slide the edge out due to the force you can apply. A longer/stiffer board will give you far far great stability at high speed. I'd be looking in the 165W park range. I'm in this same area and find that in Australia (imagine in the US of A as well) these boards are fortunately always the last to sell due to the smaller number of riders in this area so you can get some good EOS discounts on them. Sadly Snowboarding is an expensive activity but if you grab your hardware at the EOS you can do a 2 board quiver for the cost of practically 1 at full RRP.
[/QUOTEbi
The "One Board does it all???" is a fantasy that is not really achievable. You want to cover a wide range of conditions to charging Ice Coast to Freeride/Powder. I would suggest a 2 board quiver. An all mountain directional cambered twin for Ice Coast and a Freeride board (directional/tapered/setback camber) for off piste/powdery conditions. The rewards you get out of this far exceed the $$$$ outlay. You can thank me later.

You 100% want a big board (length/width ie 102kg/US11.5), looking at 162W plus. The better the rider you are, the easier it is to handle a longer length. With your weight, it will be very easy to overpower a smaller board ie lose/slide the edge out due to the force you can apply. A longer/stiffer board will give you far far great stability at high speed. I'd be looking in the 165W park range. I'm in this same area and find that in Australia (imagine in the US of A as well) these boards are fortunately always the last to sell due to the smaller number of riders in this area so you can get some good EOS discounts on them. Sadly Snowboarding is an expensive activity but if you grab your hardware at the EOS you can do a 2 board quiver for the cost of practically 1 at full RRP.
Bigger than 162W?
So I’m definitely an experienced rider, but I’ve been on the wrong board for 10 years riding the 2011 Salomon Sanchez 156…..insanely small, straight rocker and such a loose flex. Everything I don’t need right lol
So this is a learning curve for me for sure. That being said I need to get the right set up and enjoy snowboarding more than I already do.
I’ve been riding since I was a kid and I’m a big guy so I definitely have the power and experience to handle a stiffer, longer, and wider board. It’s just finding the right one and the size that actually works for me.
I’m having a hard time getting my mind set on a directional twin just because I do love the feeling of being completely centered on the board and riding switch as much as I can. If it has such a positive effect when riding in powder than I feel it must effect riding switch just as much. I wish I could just ride one to test it out.

Thank you for posting I really appreciate it!!
 

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Bigger than 162W?
So I’m definitely an experienced rider, but I’ve been on the wrong board for 10 years riding the 2011 Salomon Sanchez 156…..insanely small, straight rocker and such a loose flex. Everything I don’t need right lol
So this is a learning curve for me for sure. That being said I need to get the right set up and enjoy snowboarding more than I already do.
I’ve been riding since I was a kid and I’m a big guy so I definitely have the power and experience to handle a stiffer, longer, and wider board. It’s just finding the right one and the size that actually works for me.
I’m having a hard time getting my mind set on a directional twin just because I do love the feeling of being completely centered on the board and riding switch as much as I can. If it has such a positive effect when riding in powder than I feel it must effect riding switch just as much. I wish I could just ride one to test it out.

Thank you for posting I really appreciate it!!
if you like being centered, be centered, riding the ice coast you aren’t going to be swimming in powder so I wouldn’t worry too much about setback etc.

I’d look at the weight recommendation for the decks and ensure you are 264mm or wider at the waist, if you check that jones I sent you that’s why I recommended a 165w as it’s good above 220lbs

if you are worried about going so long after your previous deck look volume shifted. I’ve got a buddy riding out of Maine with a ride super pig, he slays all over the mountain, you would slot in on a 159 with that deck
 

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Freestyle and powder on a big long twin, or freestyle and powder on a smaller more flexible twin.
i’d want the shortest and flexible board for a freestyle, but these boards should be ridden fast in powder, but to ride them fast in powder one has to be a very good rider) powder and old tracks beneath the powder twist freestyle twins torsionally and longitudinally, kinda hard to maintain and easy to loose a balance.
Bigger, longer, stiffer twins are harder to freestyle with, and still suck in freeride situations compared to directional, tapered boards with freeride flex, especially for bigger riders.
 

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Hey everyone, been having a real hard time finding the right “do it all” board to buy. Me being almost 6’5” about 225lbs 11.5 shoe size I don’t know if I need a wide board or not. I’m in the east coast so we get very harsh conditions all winter from washy slush to straight ice.
I don’t do much park but love side hits and some jibbing and would definitely like a twin board. Also get into quite a bit of back country and powder riding.
I don’t want to buy multiple boards so I’m looking for the best “do it all” out there.
I’ve been looking at these: capita doa/super doa, Salomon huckknife, rossignol jibsaw, Rome mod
Not too worried about the price tag because I plan on riding this board for a few years.
please help!
GILSON!!!
 

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Bigger than 162W?
So I’m definitely an experienced rider, but I’ve been on the wrong board for 10 years riding the 2011 Salomon Sanchez 156…..insanely small, straight rocker and such a loose flex. Everything I don’t need right lol
So this is a learning curve for me for sure. That being said I need to get the right set up and enjoy snowboarding more than I already do.
I’ve been riding since I was a kid and I’m a big guy so I definitely have the power and experience to handle a stiffer, longer, and wider board. It’s just finding the right one and the size that actually works for me.
I’m having a hard time getting my mind set on a directional twin just because I do love the feeling of being completely centered on the board and riding switch as much as I can. If it has such a positive effect when riding in powder than I feel it must effect riding switch just as much. I wish I could just ride one to test it out.

Thank you for posting I really appreciate it!!

FFS you are on a tiny noodle of a park board....., flex rating of a 1, WW 149 at @157 when you are 102kg and 193cm/ US11.5. You are way over the weight level of this board. Basically, if you are a good rider you can be down the bottom end of a weight range and if you are a beginner you can be at the top of the weight range.
You need a board with how and where you are going to ride. Now for me at 192cm/93-100kg depending on the time of the year, I could ride a 146 park board on the icy piste but would I like it....., absolutely no way Jose. Years ago when I only had a one board quiver I took my Custom to mega powdery Niseko, Hokkaido and it went unreal...., so I thought. When I look at the video's now I see my stance is very to the rear whereas now with a dedicated powder board you can ride centred in a relaxed stance and in waist deep powder the board does practically all the work for you. The difference in riding and the joy it gives you is so amazing I can't recommend it enough. Any people in here with a quiver will 100% tell you the same thing.

Being almost a pensioner, Park is the very last thing I want to do...., so I don't buy a PARK board. I want to charge with stability at very high speed and smash slashes in banks and sidehits. I'm constantly looking for powdery areas to ride into and slash around. So I choose a snowboard for this and ride a stiff All Mountain direction twin (166W) in Australia on the piste. When it gets powdery I go to a tapered setback directional camber which gives me lift, a centred superior powder performance and stability with camber back on the piste to the lift bases. In full on powdery conditions a dedicated powder board is an ultimate Godsent.

This is what you need to consider when you look for a board. I have heaps of people that bring me boards to service and they are soft noodle park boards and they don't ride in that area. They are just all mountain riders.
 

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FFS you are on a tiny noodle of a park board....., flex rating of a 1, WW 149 at @157 when you are 102kg and 193cm/ US11.5. You are way over the weight level of this board. Basically, if you are a good rider you can be down the bottom end of a weight range and if you are a beginner you can be at the top of the weight range.
You need a board with how and where you are going to ride. Now for me at 192cm/93-100kg depending on the time of the year, I could ride a 146 park board on the icy piste but would I like it....., absolutely no way Jose. Years ago when I only had a one board quiver I took my Custom to mega powdery Niseko, Hokkaido and it went unreal...., so I thought. When I look at the video's now I see my stance is very to the rear whereas now with a dedicated powder board you can ride centred in a relaxed stance and in waist deep powder the board does practically all the work for you. The difference in riding and the joy it gives you is so different I can't recommend it enough. Any people in here with a quiver will 100% tell you the same thing.

Being almost a pensioner Park is the very last thing I want to do...., so I don't buy a PARK board. I want to charge with stability at very high speed and smash slashes in banks and sidehits. I'm constantly looking for powdery areas to ride into and slash around. So I ride a stiff All Mountain direction twin (166W) in Australia on the piste. When it gets powdery I go to a tapered setback directional camber which gives me lift, superior powder performance and stability with camber back on the piste to the lift bases. In full on powdery conditions a dedicated powder board is an ultimate Godsent.

This is what you need to consider when you look for a board. I have heaps of people that bring me boards to service and they are soft noodle park boards and they don't ride in that area. They are just all mountain riders.
Nice write up, I’m 108 kg, 196cm, I’ve been looking for a good board in rutted out hard pack/ hard moguls/ tracked trees. Any suggestions? I feel like most my decks aren’t flexy enough to roll through the bumps but worry going too soft will lose edge hold.

Also may just be a physics issue but would love any advice

Current quiver is a yes pyl 164w, a frame 169, archetype 160w, pp 157, headspace 155w
 

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Nice write up, I’m 108 kg, 196cm, I’ve been looking for a good board in rutted out hard pack/ hard moguls/ tracked trees. Any suggestions? I feel like most my decks aren’t flexy enough to roll through the bumps but worry going too soft will lose edge hold.

Also may just be a physics issue but would love any advice

Current quiver is a yes pyl 164w, a frame 169, archetype 160w, pp 157, headspace 155w
Hard packed moguls aren't a friend for Snowboarders. Being a larger/heavier rider we are unfortunately cursed with the bigger/stiffer board you need to option too. You have the power and strength to move it around but nothing can replace being on a shorter board with tighter sidecut to maneuver around the trees. In powder you can slash the tail out a lot to help you radiate a tighter line. I wash the speed way off through moguls which helps negotiate it easier or better still, ride around them.
 

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Hard packed moguls aren't a friend for Snowboarders. Being a larger/heavier rider we are unfortunately cursed with the bigger/stiffer board you need to option too. You have the power and strength to move it around but nothing can replace being on a shorter board with tighter sidecut to maneuver around the trees. In powder you can slash the tail out a lot to help you radiate a tighter line. I wash the speed way off through moguls which helps negotiate it easier or better still, ride around them.
Thnx you nailed my problem, it’s picking up too much speed, I love tight trees and bumps with powder but riding primarily east coast US with primarily skiers i am in tracked out trees or moguls more then I’d like to be. Any tricks for bleeding speed in firm moguls?
 

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I don’t do much park but love side hits and some jibbing and would definitely like a twin board. Also get into quite a bit of back country and powder riding.
Ideally, you want 2 boards. A directional cambered twin for side hits and jibbing. The other, being an S-profile...which is a directional cambered twin with some rocker in a slightly longer nose...such as an Amplid Creamer...see below link.

My 2 cents, ur a big man with some years of riding...you don't want some noodle nor rocker in the middle...hell your weight is going to rocker the middle anyway. What you want is some contact points in the nose and tail along with some good edge hold...all along the full edge...get a stiff cambered twin for goofing around on. As or powder and bc...get the Creamer.


Amplid Creamer | Snowboard | Snowcountry
 
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