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Utra mountain twin is a boss choice as they already told you!! But if you prioritize powder riding over switch riding etc, you might also wanna look into the Jones Flaghsip. With your specs I would definitely go with the 169W! You´re a big guy :)
 

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Wow LEGENDARY post man
thank you
I’ve been searching and searching and thats exactly what I’m looking for. Love every aspect of that board choice
Had to reply because I may be considered a "rad dad" and I'm a similar size at 6'4'' 215 with size 12 boots. I picked up Mountain Twin 162w for my every day board last year and I'm pretty happy with it. I'm on the west coast and avoid ice days whenever possible so can't really speak to that, but that board and size works well for me. I know the Ultra Mountain Twin is similar, I think stiffer, but I'm sure either would be a pretty solid choice. Plus the graphics are a little more dad friendly that others...if you care about type of stuff.
 

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Hey everyone, been having a real hard time finding the right “do it all” board to buy. Me being almost 6’5” about 225lbs 11.5 shoe size I don’t know if I need a wide board or not. I’m in the east coast so we get very harsh conditions all winter from washy slush to straight ice.
I don’t do much park but love side hits and some jibbing and would definitely like a twin board. Also get into quite a bit of back country and powder riding.
I don’t want to buy multiple boards so I’m looking for the best “do it all” out there.
I’ve been looking at these: capita doa/super doa, Salomon huckknife, rossignol jibsaw, Rome mod
Not too worried about the price tag because I plan on riding this board for a few years.
please help!
FWIW I love my Rossi Jibsaw HD 160w. It isn’t wide enough but very few boards are and they are usually powder or party boards.
 

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Hey everyone, been having a real hard time finding the right “do it all” board to buy. Me being almost 6’5” about 225lbs 11.5 shoe size I don’t know if I need a wide board or not.
Hi Ryan,

11.5 Shoe size is a US 10.5 snowboard boot size. That does not require a "wide" or "mid-wide" board (quotes used because there is no industry standard for these terms, and they vary greatly by brand and model). Sizing by shoe size, however, is not the best way to go about it. All gear should really be sized by barefoot measurement. If you have a minute please take your four measurements. Let's get this right for you!

Rider height is not a factor in board sizing, but barefoot measurement is crucial to getting this right. Please measure your feet using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
 

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Hey everyone, been having a real hard time finding the right “do it all” board to buy. Me being almost 6’5” about 225lbs 11.5 shoe size I don’t know if I need a wide board or not. I’m in the east coast so we get very harsh conditions all winter from washy slush to straight ice.
I don’t do much park but love side hits and some jibbing and would definitely like a twin board. Also get into quite a bit of back country and powder riding.
I don’t want to buy multiple boards so I’m looking for the best “do it all” out there.
I’ve been looking at these: capita doa/super doa, Salomon huckknife, rossignol jibsaw, Rome mod
Not too worried about the price tag because I plan on riding this board for a few years.
please help!
There really is no do everything board. A board with a big rocker nose to lift you up in powder and carvey mid board area under feet to handle the firm is as close as you can get but it's not going to be a twin. Tough calls all around.

I just started riding a Stranda shorty. Very good board. Might be worth looking at their line. A big portion of serous riders on my east coast mountain are lib tech oriented.
 

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Hi Ryan,

Figured I'd chime in with my two cents given that I recently went through the process of selecting a new board using this forum and professional consultation as well...

I'm an East Coast guy as well. 5' 11", 195 lbs, 11.5- 12 boot depending on the boot. I was looking for some of the same things as you, except I wanted something that would slay the whole mountain including the park. Ice is an obv. concern as you mentioned. I ended up with a Nitro Team Pro 162W and a Ride Algorythm 160W. I haven't ridden either yet but I selected them for very specific reasons.

Based on what you've said and other's comments, I agree that you will definitely benefit from a longer/ wider board. The added length will help support your weight and improve stability at speed, edge hold, carving dynamics, and float in powder. I agree that 162W+ is probably the range you're in. Especially at 250+ lbs., if you feel you can handle it, and since you're not a dedicated park guy, longer will be better for the aforementioned reasons. Maybe even a 165W (ballpark) would be best.

Also, to chime in on the directional twin conversation, you probably will not even notice much of a difference riding switch on a directional twin. Any differences you do notice will probably be quickly adjusted to, given that you're going to be adjusting to a new board, in general. Also because you mentioned it as being important (although we don't really get much pow on the EC lol), the directional twin will give you better float in powder when riding directionally but this will also be less significant when compared to a freeride/ true powder board. This mirrors some of the comments being made about a 2 board quiver being your best option. There truly isn't a "does everything best" board on the market. You will inevitably sacrifice something somewhere with one board.

That being said, because of the lack of pow we get on the EC. I'd say prioritize something that will give you the best of both riding switch and improved float in powder, aka, the directional twin. However, if you value riding switch more, go true twin, if you value float in pow more, look for a freeride/ powder board (again, this seems somewhat counter intuitive to me being that there's so much ice on the EC but totally your call!). Also, I'd stay away from reverse camber/ rocker and hybrid camber boards as they will float better in pow but do not do as well on ice. Camber is king for hold on ice. Edge tech. like Magnetraction works great for awhile but will inevitably dull and ultimately fail on ice. It's also not nearly as easy to tune and keep sharp. Trust me, I bought that hype several years back and regretted it. I'm sure it's great in some scenarios but not great on the EC, especially if you plan on owning the board for awhile. Again, I'd suggest true camber for ultimate edge hold on ice. Nitro has some of the best sidecuts in the game in this regard. Also, a cam/rocker could be ideal for you as well. You will get easier turn initiation, better float in powder, and a little more playfulness due to small rocker sections in tip/ tail but the camber under foot will give you edge hold, power, and pop. You will sacrifice some edge hold compared to a true camber board but you also gain the aforementioned benefits. It def. fits the rad dad bill nicely and is as close to "the best of all worlds" as it gets IMHO. Thus why I went true camber with my Nitro for hard, fast, icy riding and cam/ rock with the Algorythm for a still seriously capable but more playful/ laid back ride. Also, one last suggestion. Given what you've described, I'd look for something around 7/10 flex.

Hope this helps!

TM
 

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Oh, and another thing! A lot of people on here will tell you conflicting info and make generalizations about boot size and, subsequently, board width. People see/ hear a guy say he wears size 12 boots and automatically assume the boots are ill-fitted and too big. I ran into that I'm my thread lol. That being said, it is true that a lot of people don't wear correctly sized boots. 1/2 to 1 size down is generally a good rule of thumb but it's not an exact science. Neither is mondopoint sizing. It all comes down to the individual boot. Put the boot on, kick your heal back, and tighten up. They should be tight! Your toes should touch the front but should not be crunched or bent. The way I "know" my size, in a given boot, is that I order the same boot in multiple sizes, i.e., 11, 11.5, 12 and return what I don't need. It sucks spending $1400 on Adidas.com lol but you'll get it back when the return processes and it's totally worth knowing that you have the right size boots on. Once you know your true and accurate boot size, you'll know whether you need a wide board or not. Cheers!
 

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Thnx you nailed my problem, it’s picking up too much speed, I love tight trees and bumps with powder but riding primarily east coast US with primarily skiers i am in tracked out trees or moguls more then I’d like to be. Any tricks for bleeding speed in firm moguls?
I've been pounding east coast moguls for 30 years. I used to have a pile of boards cracked right in front the front binding from diving them into moguls and bending the heck out of them.. New boards luckily don't do that any more.

Boards accelerate faster than skis in moguls so if you follow the skier line you will be moving way too fast in a very short time. You need to carve further up on the face and more to the front than skiers to bleed speed. Bump skiers tend to hit about 1/3 of the way around the mogul face and about 2/3 of the way down the face. On a board you almost need to hit right on the face about 1/2 of the way up with lots of edge. The good thing is you frequently have some loose snow once you get above the icy skier line. NEVER get low enough on the mogul for the tail to get trapped in the trough. Very bad.

You need to get a kind of jump/hop turn going where you dive the nose, load the edge, and pop off the tail to have enough momentum to whip the board around. You sort of end up sucking up the back leg and swinging the back foot WAY around and fast. You have to really be willing to commit totally on the toe side. If you do it right you end up with the board way behind you totally out of sight on toe side like it's gong to hit you in the azz. You also need to have a LOT of body contraction and extension. . Do it right and your stomach muscles will be aching from sucking the board up and swinging around so much. Keeping low is good. My buds call my mogul riding the stepped on cockroach stance. I ride feet foward 30/25 and a narrow stance which I feel lets me get the board around faster. .

All of this applies to trees too. My rule of tree sking is never go faster than I'm are willing to smash my face into a tree. Rule 2 is never ever look at the trees. Always look at the gaps.
 

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I've been pounding east coast moguls for 30 years. I used to have a pile of boards cracked right in front the front binding from diving them into mougals and bending the heck out of them.. New boards luckily don't do that any more.

Boards accelerate faster than skis in moguls so if you follow the skier line you will be moving way too fast in a very short time. You need to carve further up on the face and more to the front than skiers to bleed speed. Bump skiers tend to hit about 1/3 of the way around the mougal face and about 2/3 of the way down the face. On a board you almost need to hit right on the face about 1/2 of the way up with lots of edge. The good thing is you frequently have some loose snow once you get above the icy skier line. NEVER get low enough on the mougal for the tail to get trapped in the trough. Very bad.

You need to get a kind of jump/hop turn going where you dive the nose, load the edge, and pop off the tail to have enough momentum to whip the board around. You sort of end up sucking up the back leg and swinging the back foot WAY around and fast. You have to really be willing to commit totally on the toe side. If you do it right you end up with the board way behind you totally out of sight on toe side like it's gong to hit you in the azz. You also need to have a LOT of body contraction and extension. . Do it right and your stomach muscles will be aching from sucking the board up and swinging around so much. Keeping low is good. My buds call my mogul riding the stepped on cockroach stance. I ride feet foward 30/25 and a narrow stance which I feel lets me get the board around faster. .

All of this applies to trees too. My rule of tree sking is never go faster than I'm are willing to smash my face into a tree. Rule 2 is never ever look at the trees. Always look at the gaps.
I want to ride behind you and learn all this.
 

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I want to ride behind you and learn all this.
Not this year, I'm overseas. Heading out to the Remarkables this afternoon. Probably one of the best big mountain steep open bowls extreme skiing there is. Too bad I'm not at all into that. No moguls, trees, or edge running crud is pretty frigging boring as far as I'm concerned. Hope to get back to the big K by March for spring skiing, but I"ll be relearning my mogul skills for a while after a 2 year lay off. . It is NOT like riding a bike
 

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Oh, and another thing! A lot of people on here will tell you conflicting info and make generalizations about boot size and, subsequently, board width. People see/ hear a guy say he wears size 12 boots and automatically assume the boots are ill-fitted and too big. I ran into that I'm my thread lol. That being said, it is true that a lot of people don't wear correctly sized boots. 1/2 to 1 size down is generally a good rule of thumb but it's not an exact science. Neither is mondopoint sizing. It all comes down to the individual boot. Put the boot on, kick your heal back, and tighten up. They should be tight! Your toes should touch the front but should not be crunched or bent. The way I "know" my size, in a given boot, is that I order the same boot in multiple sizes, i.e., 11, 11.5, 12 and return what I don't need. It sucks spending $1400 on Adidas.com lol but you'll get it back when the return processes and it's totally worth knowing that you have the right size boots on. Once you know your true and accurate boot size, you'll know whether you need a wide board or not. Cheers!
Hi TMA,
A few things if I might. The OP wrote in his first post that he has a size 11.5 shoe. It is important to note that shoe size and snowboard boot size are never the same. If someone has been sizing boots based on shoe size they should always go back and get their 4 barefoot measurements. Mondopoint sizing, matching length and width will work every time and it will be the correct fit for a snowboard boot however, the boots will not fit like shoes.

Just touching the front of the liner is too large. We look for firm pressure into the compliant materials of the liner at both the toes and the heels. I have pasted our fit tips below. Snowboard boots pack out roughly 1 cm (one full boot size) over the first few weeks of riding. A boot purchased as just touching will be too large on day one and way to large after break in.

Your boots should be snug!
The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not too tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!

STOKED!
 

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Hi TMA,
A few things if I might. The OP wrote in his first post that he has a size 11.5 shoe. It is important to note that shoe size and snowboard boot size are never the same. If someone has been sizing boots based on shoe size they should always go back and get their 4 barefoot measurements. Mondopoint sizing, matching length and width will work every time and it will be the correct fit for a snowboard boot however, the boots will not fit like shoes.

Just touching the front of the liner is too large. We look for firm pressure into the compliant materials of the liner at both the toes and the heels. I have pasted our fit tips below. Snowboard boots pack out roughly 1 cm (one full boot size) over the first few weeks of riding. A boot purchased as just touching will be too large on day one and way to large after break in.

Your boots should be snug!
The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not too tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!

STOKED!
Hey Wired,
First, no disrespect or argumentativeness intended. You clearly understand boot sizing well. I agree with almost everything you said and feel like I said many similar things just less descriptively. Kick your heal back, check. Tighten, check. Firm pressure, check (I meant against the front of the boot, not the liner). They will fit differently than shoes, check. They will be snug, check. Fit will vary by boot, check. A lot of people's boots are not properly fitted, check. So with all those things, I'm in total agreement. The only thing that I will dispute is mondopoint sizing being the end all/ be all. According to mondopoint I should be wearing a 10.5- 11 depending on the manufacturers size chart (most commonly a 10.5). For reference, I wear a 12.5 sneaker (professionally fitted by a local running store). I have never fit a 10.5 boot. Using all the aforementioned fitting tips, I wear an 11.5 in my most recently purchased boots. My Nike Zoom Kaiju's are a 12 and even after pack-out my toes still lightly brush the front of the boot. I've heard many riders say this exact same thing. How then can I rely solely on mondopoint? Thanks!
 

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Hey Wired,
First, no disrespect or argumentativeness intended. You clearly understand boot sizing well. I agree with almost everything you said and feel like I said many similar things just less descriptively. Kick your heal back, check. Tighten, check. Firm pressure, check (I meant against the front of the boot, not the liner). They will fit differently than shoes, check. They will be snug, check. Fit will vary by boot, check. A lot of people's boots are not properly fitted, check. So with all those things, I'm in total agreement. The only thing that I will dispute is mondopoint sizing being the end all/ be all. According to mondopoint I should be wearing a 10.5- 11 depending on the manufacturers size chart (most commonly a 10.5). For reference, I wear a 12.5 sneaker (professionally fitted by a local running store). I have never fit a 10.5 boot. Using all the aforementioned fitting tips, I wear an 11.5 in my most recently purchased boots. My Nike Zoom Kaiju's are a 12 and even after pack-out my toes still lightly brush the front of the boot. I've heard many riders say this exact same thing. How then can I rely solely on mondopoint? Thanks!
Hi TMA,

I would strongly suggest that you get your barefoot width measurements as well. This can change your riding life! I don't mean to be pushy but we hear the above all the time. When experienced riders are above their Mondo size it is very often that they are matching only Mondo length (which will never work for wider feet).

If you have a moment please provide your four barefoot measurements.

Please measure your feet using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
 

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Hi TMA,
A few things if I might. The OP wrote in his first post that he has a size 11.5 shoe. It is important to note that shoe size and snowboard boot size are never the same. If someone has been sizing boots based on shoe size they should always go back and get their 4 barefoot measurements. Mondopoint sizing, matching length and width will work every time and it will be the correct fit for a snowboard boot however, the boots will not fit like shoes.

Just touching the front of the liner is too large. We look for firm pressure into the compliant materials of the liner at both the toes and the heels. I have pasted our fit tips below. Snowboard boots pack out roughly 1 cm (one full boot size) over the first few weeks of riding. A boot purchased as just touching will be too large on day one and way to large after break in.

Your boots should be snug!
The most common complaint about boots is that they are too loose, not too tight. The junction between rider and board begins with the boot, as it is in the most direct contact with the rider. When fitting boots, use the following method: A. Slip into the boot. B. Kick your heel back against the ground several times to drive it back into the boot's heel pocket. C. Lace the boot tightly, as though you were going to ride. NOTE: This is where most sizing mistakes are made. A snowboard boot is shaped like an upside down "7". The back has a good degree of forward lean. Thus, when you drop into the boot, your heel may be resting up to an inch away from the back of the boot, and your toes may be jammed into the front of the boot. Until the boot is tightly laced, you will not know if it is a proper fit. D. Your toes should now have firm pressure against the front of the boot. As this is the crux of sizing, let's discuss firm pressure: When you flex your knee forward hard, the pressure should lighten, or cease, as your toes pull back. At no time should you feel numbness or lose circulation. Your toes will be in contact with the end of the boot, unlike in a properly fit street or athletic shoe (snowboard boots are designed to fit more snugly than your other shoes). When you have achieved this combination of firm pressure and no circulation loss, you have found the correct size!

STOKED!
Hi TMA,

I would strongly suggest that you get your barefoot width measurements as well. This can change your riding life! I don't mean to be pushy but we hear the above all the time. When experienced riders are above their Mondo size it is very often that they are matching only Mondo length (which will never work for wider feet).

If you have a moment please provide your four barefoot measurements.

Please measure your feet using this method:

Kick your heel (barefoot please, no socks) back against a wall. Mark the floor exactly at the tip of your toe (the one that sticks out furthest - which toe this is will vary by rider). Measure from the mark on the floor to the wall. That is your foot length and is the only measurement that you will want to use. Measure in centimeters if possible, but if not, take inches and multiply by 2.54 (example: an 11.25 inch foot x 2.54 = 28.57 centimeters). For width please place the inside (medial side) of your foot against a wall. Please then measure from the wall out to the widest point on the lateral (outside) of your foot.
Hey Wired,
That makes total sense and has played into my thinking as well, as the run shop told me I have moderately wide feet. Here are my barefoot measurements..

Right foot: length= 27.3cm, width= 10.4cm
Left foot: length= 27.3cm, width= 10.75cm

Thanks!
 

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Hey Wired,
That makes total sense and has played into my thinking as well, as the run shop told me I have moderately wide feet. Here are my barefoot measurements..

Right foot: length= 27.3cm, width= 10.4cm
Left foot: length= 27.3cm, width= 10.75cm

Thanks!
Hi TMA,

Got it. 27.3 cm is mid range for mondopoint 275 or size 9.5 US in snowboard boots. The range for this size is 27.1 to 27.5 cm. Your width however is EE which does require a very specific group of boots. Please have a look at the chart below. You will see that at size 9.5 you need an EE width. If you look down the "standard" D width column, you will see that you cannot match your foot width until you get to size 12 (your current boot size). All standard width snowboard boots will feel too short for you at your actual Mondo size. This is due to the arced shape of the toebox. I am sure all of this sounds bizarre and unlikely and it will require a bit of a leap of faith due to your past sizing experiences. On the upside, if you have been riding larger boots and subsequently wider boards and larger bindings, you are in for a HUGE performance leap when you correct this (and likely the best season of your life) :)

Please keep in mind that this is not at all unusual. I size many people for boots every day (coming up on 30 years now) and I come across this every day.

Burton makes great boots in EEE width. I would strongly suggest the Ruler Wide, Photon Wide or Ion Wide in size 9.5. I don't suggest their Step on models.

 

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Hi TMA,

Got it. 27.3 cm is mid range for mondopoint 275 or size 9.5 US in snowboard boots. The range for this size is 27.1 to 27.5 cm. Your width however is EE which does require a very specific group of boots. Please have a look at the chart below. You will see that at size 9.5 you need an EE width. If you look down the "standard" D width column, you will see that you cannot match your foot width until you get to size 12 (your current boot size). All standard width snowboard boots will feel too short for you at your actual Mondo size. This is due to the arced shape of the toebox. I am sure all of this sounds bizarre and unlikely and it will require a bit of a leap of faith due to your past sizing experiences. On the upside, if you have been riding larger boots and subsequently wider boards and larger bindings, you are in for a HUGE performance leap when you correct this (and likely the best season of your life) :)

Please keep in mind that this is not at all unusual. I size many people for boots every day (coming up on 30 years now) and I come across this every day.

Burton makes great boots in EEE width. I would strongly suggest the Ruler Wide, Photon Wide or Ion Wide in size 9.5. I don't suggest their Step on models.

That makes a lot of sense (compensating length for width all these years). In the back of my mind I knew I was probably doing so but didn't think it was such a big deal. I still find it hard to believe that a 9.5 wide will fit me but I do believe you and am willing to try it out. I just wish there were more wide boot options on the market. That being said, I've been riding wide boards and L/ XL bindings for years. At a 9.5 boot, however, it seems I could be riding regular width boards? You make some pretty bold (not a bad thing =)) claims about doing so being a total game changer which is obviously intriguing haha. I already ride at a pretty high level with the park being the exception. How will riding a regular width board make such a huge difference for me? Since your last post, I've been reading a lot about normal width vs. wide board and there seems to be a lot of debate. I've read several of your comments about barefoot size being the most import factor to determine width, being that this in how leverage on the edges is ultimately created at the center inserts, which makes a lot of sense. However, some people argue that wide boards are just generally better. Interested to hear your take on this as well.

Also, I'm now rethinking everything lol as I have a brand new Nitro Team Pro 162W, a Ride Algorythm 160W, a set of Rome Katana bindings, size L/ XL, a set of Flux XF bindings, size L/ XL, and two pairs of Adidas Adv Tacticals sitting in front of me and I'm wondering if I now need to return everything for normal width versions of the boards, smaller size bindings, and Burton wide boots (luckily all still doable, given that it's all still brand new). Being that I fall into that 27.5 range, what size board widths should I be looking at? Also, I know most manufacturers list waist width but it seem width at the insert points is more important, however, most munfacturers don't list this number. How do I factor this into the equation? Thanks again! You may be saving me from wasting thousands of dollars on less than ideal gear.
 

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That makes a lot of sense (compensating length for width all these years). In the back of my mind I knew I was probably doing so but didn't think it was such a big deal. I still find it hard to believe that a 9.5 wide will fit me but I do believe you and am willing to try it out. I just wish there were more wide boot options on the market. That being said, I've been riding wide boards and L/ XL bindings for years. At a 9.5 boot, however, it seems I could be riding regular width boards? You make some pretty bold (not a bad thing =)) claims about doing so being a total game changer which is obviously intriguing haha. I already ride at a pretty high level with the park being the exception. How will riding a regular width board make such a huge difference for me? Since your last post, I've been reading a lot about normal width vs. wide board and there seems to be a lot of debate. I've read several of your comments about barefoot size being the most import factor to determine width, being that this in how leverage on the edges is ultimately created at the center inserts, which makes a lot of sense. However, some people argue that wide boards are just generally better. Interested to hear your take on this as well.

Also, I'm now rethinking everything lol as I have a brand new Nitro Team Pro 162W, a Ride Algorythm 160W, a set of Rome Katana bindings, size L/ XL, a set of Flux XF bindings, size L/ XL, and two pairs of Adidas Adv Tacticals sitting in front of me and I'm wondering if I now need to return everything for normal width versions of the boards, smaller size bindings, and Burton wide boots (luckily all still doable, given that it's all still brand new). Being that I fall into that 27.5 range, what size board widths should I be looking at? Also, I know most manufacturers list waist width but it seem width at the insert points is more important, however, most munfacturers don't list this number. How do I factor this into the equation? Thanks again! You may be saving me from wasting thousands of dollars on less than ideal gear.
Hi TMA,

Those are great questions that really cut to the heart of all snowboard gear sizing. Lets' start with the sure things. :). Everyone wants to ride with as little excess boot as they can. That is just all win. Less weight, less drag, more immediate response, etc. This also allows the smallest possible binding. Again, all win. The correct binding size for the boot and foot will offer better support, less drag, lighter weight, etc.

Boards. You want to match board width to barefoot length in all instances with boots out of the equation. For all newer riders and most other riders (myself included), a bit of barefoot overhang (toes and heels extending slightly past the boards edges) is ideal. That allows super easy and positive turn initiation and edge to edge control. As long as the overhang is not too great you can still edge hard without boot bite. This covers all normal riding. I know that you will have a blest on a board sized like this. You will be shocked by how intuitive and immediate riding becomes.

As you have noted there are riders who do shred on wide boards. A lot of the time they are trenching out super deep carves and value that side of riding heavily. Quite a few (not all) have also adapted other gear elements (bindings in particular) to assist with this. All who do it well, have spent time adapting their technique to this style of riding. Powder boards also may be wider, although that is really a different beast.

For you I would order a set of Burton Wide boots in size 9.5. I do think you are going to return all of that other gear. 9.5 is a Medium binding in Burton and can be medium in Flux as well. I would not suggest a wide board for you with size 9.5. I have 11.5 boots and ride standard width, so you can see where my bias is :).

STOKED!
 

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@ Wiredsport Will a burton wide ruler boot (size 9.5) fit into a medium union binding base plate (strata & atlas)? I have a regular ruler and the width of the boot barely fits into the base plate? I can't imagine a wider boot will fit into the same binding?
 

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5,934 Posts
@ Wiredsport Will a burton wide ruler boot (size 9.5) fit into a medium union binding base plate (strata & atlas)? I have a regular ruler and the width of the boot barely fits into the base plate? I can't imagine a wider boot will fit into the same binding?
Hi Sushi,
I am not sure about that combo. In almost instances, yes, but you will need to check those specifics.
 
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