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Am I the only one that is growing increasingly annoyed with this SnowboardAddiction troll? Stop with the thinly veiled threads to drive up your hit counts, buy some adpsace instead.
 

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I hadn't seen that article before...I enjoyed it. I often wonder how people pull it off, move to the place of your dreams. Whistler is on my short list of places to move to for sure, I would probably end up in Vancouver, but that would blow current location out of the water.

There isn’t day that I don’t think about giving up what I have to move out some cool place where I can unlimited access to my recreations (mountain biking, snowboarding, back packing, rock climbing) The sad part is I have a great job that a lot of people would kill for….Starting in 2011 I will have 5 weeks vacation, I make descent money…I am respected among my co workers, subordinates and managers. My heart just isn’t in my career, it is in my recreations…At age of 34 I am feel like I am running out of time to make the move.

I wonder how people pull it off, some of my fears include not being able to make a living at all. Almost worse would be to be able to get by but not have enough money to participate in my recreations…that would be torture to live in whistler and not be able to afford to snow board…

I will have to say I have nothing but admiration for individuals that pull this kind life off, living to board or having a life that is all about recreation.

Has anyone on this board pulled this off, how old were you and are still living the dream now?how old are you now? How you do it?
 

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I hadn't seen that article before...I enjoyed it. I often wonder how people pull it off, move to the place of your dreams. Whistler is on my short list of places to move to for sure, I would probably end up in Vancouver, but that would blow current location out of the water.

There isn’t day that I don’t think about giving up what I have to move out some cool place where I can unlimited access to my recreations (mountain biking, snowboarding, back packing, rock climbing) The sad part is I have a great job that a lot of people would kill for….Starting in 2011 I will have 5 weeks vacation, I make descent money…I am respected among my co workers, subordinates and managers. My heart just isn’t in my career, it is in my recreations…At age of 34 I am feel like I am running out of time to make the move.

I wonder how people pull it off, some of my fears include not being able to make a living at all. Almost worse would be to be able to get by but not have enough money to participate in my recreations…that would be torture to live in whistler and not be able to afford to snow board…

I will have to say I have nothing but admiration for individuals that pull this kind life off, living to board or having a life that is all about recreation.

Has anyone on this board pulled this off, how old were you and are still living the dream now?how old are you now? How you do it?
Hey man you just have to do it!

I gave up a great job in Melbourne my home town to come work in a ski town in Canada. After two and a half years I'm starting to do well but this time I'm only 10 mins from the closest ski hill. I get to do all the recreation I want when I want it and I never sit in traffic! You are right about one thing though. At a point you will get a job that is too good to leave and all of a sudden you will be too old to do it!
 

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I hadn't seen that article before...I enjoyed it. I often wonder how people pull it off, move to the place of your dreams. Whistler is on my short list of places to move to for sure, I would probably end up in Vancouver, but that would blow current location out of the water.

There isn’t day that I don’t think about giving up what I have to move out some cool place where I can unlimited access to my recreations (mountain biking, snowboarding, back packing, rock climbing) The sad part is I have a great job that a lot of people would kill for….Starting in 2011 I will have 5 weeks vacation, I make descent money…I am respected among my co workers, subordinates and managers. My heart just isn’t in my career, it is in my recreations…At age of 34 I am feel like I am running out of time to make the move.

I wonder how people pull it off, some of my fears include not being able to make a living at all. Almost worse would be to be able to get by but not have enough money to participate in my recreations…that would be torture to live in whistler and not be able to afford to snow board…

I will have to say I have nothing but admiration for individuals that pull this kind life off, living to board or having a life that is all about recreation.

Has anyone on this board pulled this off, how old were you and are still living the dream now?how old are you now? How you do it?
i have many of the same questions at age 27.

i say, try it. you only live once. but yeah, easier said than done and it takes a lot of balls to take the plunge...
 

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I've taken three chances in my life and I will take more!

1) I dropped out of a very highly ranked university because I wanted to work in a lumber yard and hang out with my friends on weekends.

2) After a year I returned to college, got a BS in SE, and moved to Portland, OR. I had 5,000 in my pocket and nothing waiting for me, not even a place to stay. It was great!

3) 2.5 years ago I got an opportunity to help start a company in San Francisco. I flew down here, found a place, and moved all in the span of 7 days.

.....

Life is all about opportunities to follow your heart. They wont always be the stuff dreams are made of. However, they will always make you happy in the long run!
 

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Yeah I'm hoping that once I'm out of highschool to move to Salt Lake City for a couple of years and just have fun and snowboard. And then go to college and settle in more, but I think I still wanna stay in Utah after college or maybe go to another big mountain.
 

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Wow...this is not the article I needed to read.

I want to move to Denver, but my gf of almost 5 years has not an ounce of interest in leaving Michigan.

I'm stuck in the middle....
 

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I hadn't seen that article before...I enjoyed it. I often wonder how people pull it off, move to the place of your dreams. Whistler is on my short list of places to move to for sure, I would probably end up in Vancouver, but that would blow current location out of the water.

There isn’t day that I don’t think about giving up what I have to move out some cool place where I can unlimited access to my recreations (mountain biking, snowboarding, back packing, rock climbing) The sad part is I have a great job that a lot of people would kill for….Starting in 2011 I will have 5 weeks vacation, I make descent money…I am respected among my co workers, subordinates and managers. My heart just isn’t in my career, it is in my recreations…At age of 34 I am feel like I am running out of time to make the move.

I wonder how people pull it off, some of my fears include not being able to make a living at all. Almost worse would be to be able to get by but not have enough money to participate in my recreations…that would be torture to live in whistler and not be able to afford to snow board…

I will have to say I have nothing but admiration for individuals that pull this kind life off, living to board or having a life that is all about recreation.

Has anyone on this board pulled this off, how old were you and are still living the dream now?how old are you now? How you do it?
Do it! Moved from Nebraska to Bham at age 29 with wife, 3 yr old and about $2000, moved for grad school age 34 with same wife, 8 yr old, 3 month old and the same $2000. At 40 back to Bham...still same wife and kids, past 5 years with fine job/career working part time (I consider it semi-retired)...not rich but pays the bills and the house and have gotten to ride 1-2 days a week for the past 6 years...now age 52. It takes a couple of years to get settled in a new place and get to a break even point. Btw, there is always work...its just a matter of how much you want/need to get paid.
 

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I can certainly understand and appreciate the freedom that comes with dropping all education, job and familial obligations. It must be great feeling to leave everything behind and start completely over on your own terms but please for the love of god stop telling us about it. There is nothing more sanctimonious than one who sees the error in their old ways and needs to convince others that their descion was correct. The ex-smoker, the born again christian, the ex party kid who gets out of town to change his ways. The only person they are trying to convince is themselves.

Here is what your family things about you living in Whistler: They MISS you. They look at the missing place at Thanksgiving, they don't really want to mail your Christmas gifts and they want to ride with you again. It has little to do with you abandoning your precious education or jealousy over your new-found "better" life. Jesus Christ how fucking self centered can you be?
 

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I think the important thing in life is to follow whatever makes you happy, regardless of what you're "supposed" to do. I think we have fooled ourselves into thinking that with the new high-paying job, the tract-home next to 20,000 other tract-homes, the shiny expensive car, and 3 truckloads of crap you never use but bought anyways, your life will be complete.

People get to this stage, and they still realize their lives are lacking something. Ever notice that tremendously rich people are often the most unhappy people you have ever met? They are tortured everyday because technically they should have everything they have ever wanted, but it's still never enough.

Happiness is in the eyes of the beholder, I think my favorite example of this is a mentally handicapped employee I see at the local Walmart. All that guy does all day long is push carts back and forth; a very menial job, but that guy has the biggest smile on his face I've ever seen. He has one of the most boring jobs you can have, but he's easily the happiest employee working there.

If you can pursue a high-paying career and still fulfill your happiness in life, you will have it made. But for many the years drag on and all they can think about is how life would have been had they made the other decision.

True happiness is not obtained by money and toys, and I think the "American Dream" has been fooling people for a century into thinking, "if only I had more of that, Maybe I would be happy".
 

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Here is what your family things about you living in Whistler: They MISS you. They look at the missing place at Thanksgiving, they don't really want to mail your Christmas gifts and they want to ride with you again. It has little to do with you abandoning your precious education or jealousy over your new-found "better" life. Jesus Christ how fucking self centered can you be?

^BS there is nothing more santimonious...

I care about my kids and miss them, but I'm all for them pursuing their dream. If they want to drop school, job and don't have a family or willing to be responsible for themselves and to their spouse/kids...fuck go for it. School should not get in the way of education, jobs are over-rated...a person is lucky to find a job they are passionate about and get paid for it; and if they want to change it up or be an ex whatever...at least they are trying something. I want my kids to be competent, have integrity, be passionate and be graceful towards others and themselves...but on their terms...not mine. I might not like or make the same decisions...but it is their life and their opportunity to learn. Btw, I want my kids away...already have one in Alaska...another one Whistler would be great and I vote for 1 of the 3 to move to a warm place like Micronesia, Costa Rica, Morocco, Indian ocean or such...so I can go visit them.
 

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KY,
U should fly out to PNW on your 5 week vac, rent a van/car, hang out and bring resumes. What I did in 1989 on a 2 week vac, camped and slept in a van, ran around Portland, Seattle and Bham. Got job offers in Seattle and Bham...chose Bham due to being closer to the woods and not being in a city...If I want the city, Vancouver is 45 min and Seattle is 90 min. Went back to Nebr. had a big ass garage sale, bought a $500 1 ton van, loaded it up "beverely hillbilly style" and towed my little toyota wagon; lived in a 1 room cabin without running water for 6 weeks til the wife found us an affordable place to rent; sold the van and made $1000 so it paid for the move.
 

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Yes, of course it would be amazing to give up all responsibility, obligation, rationality, and live gloriously in lack of ambition. Who wouldn't want to wake up everyday and do exactly what makes them happy. You can look at it as; turning your back on what your parents/society feel you should do, choosing not to participate in a disgusting dog eat dog selfish existance fuelled by the need to mindlessly consume and amass wealth so others can't attain it, spending the greatest years of your life living in the moment and following your dreams, etc.

But this is a bubble. Yes, you're insulated from a cold harsh world that personally angers me to the point where sometimes I dream of killing insurance executives and lighting fire to federal buildings & banks, but this world still exists. And eventually you'll need to return to it. And in it you'll need A mortgage, medical coverage, insurance, steady income, and eventually old age security and a pension. This is why it isn't feasible to give up on careers and education. Living the ski bum life is something I wish everybody to do, but it has to be done right.
 

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Yes, of course it would be amazing to give up all responsibility, obligation, rationality, and live gloriously in lack of ambition. Who wouldn't want to wake up everyday and do exactly what makes them happy. You can look at it as; turning your back on what your parents/society feel you should do, choosing not to participate in a disgusting dog eat dog selfish existance fuelled by the need to mindlessly consume and amass wealth so others can't attain it, spending the greatest years of your life living in the moment and following your dreams, etc.

But this is a bubble. Yes, you're insulated from a cold harsh world that personally angers me to the point where sometimes I dream of killing insurance executives and lighting fire to federal buildings & banks, but this world still exists. And eventually you'll need to return to it. And in it you'll need A mortgage, medical coverage, insurance, steady income, and eventually old age security and a pension. This is why it isn't feasible to give up on careers and education. Living the ski bum life is something I wish everybody to do, but it has to be done right.
Making it work in a mountain town does mean you have to live day to day and paycheck to paycheck. It ally depends on what your skills are or what new skills you are able to learn.

I'm lucky that I'm a programmer. I can make a decent living anywhere I have connection to the internet. :p
 

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Wrathfuldeity did it right. Got an education, got a job, and still is able to do what he's passionate about while fulfilling the obligation as a provider to his family.

Snowolf's doing it right too. The guy drives a truck and also works as an instructor allowing him to be on the hill while still being able to provide himself lifes nessecities in a long term manner.

I would love nothing more to live this lifestyle. But I'm happy with my career and I'm doing something I'm passionate about on a full time basis. There are very little opportunities for me to work in my field in a small mountain town and it's not responsible to choose not to participate in society. As well, both my family and the trophy gf's family are here and as they get older, they'll need to rely on us as we had once relyed on them years ago.

The best time to be a ski bum is for a couple years after high school or University. This is a way of life, but it's not a full time job
 
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