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Thanks for the feedback so far guys.(y)

The shoe size is a funny thing, Most of the shoes and boots and that I can still read the tag on say 12 US 46 EU. So probably a labeling issue. I'm a pretty consistent size 12 US but occasionally have to go up to a half or whole size 12.5-13 in some manufactures. Solomon for instance. I also need to use an orthotic insert instead of the flimsy thing they call an insert/foot bed. So that sometimes forces me to a slightly larger shoe.

My current one and only board is an old Burton Baron 167 circa 2007. Ha! Started riding before that board though. It was tricky to find a board to fit my feet back then and I also had an industry discount with Burton at the time. Had to take about a 3 year hiatus to heal some MTB and various other injuries/ailments. But been back riding 4 years now.
 

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I think people forget that the scale goes:
Beginner, intermediate, advanced, expert, pro, godlike.
I dunno about expert and pro, it's more like addons. Pro means you get paid a salary by a company to ride their stuff. Expert doesn't feel general enough to me, it means you do at least one thing well, but can agree that you should be at least advanced in general to be called an expert at something.
 

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Thanks for the feedback so far guys.(y)

The shoe size is a funny thing, Most of the shoes and boots and that I can still read the tag on say 12 US 46 EU. So probably a labeling issue. I'm a pretty consistent size 12 US but occasionally have to go up to a half or whole size 12.5-13 in some manufactures. Solomon for instance. I also need to use an orthotic insert instead of the flimsy thing they call an insert/foot bed. So that sometimes forces me to a slightly larger shoe.

My current one and only board is an old Burton Baron 167 circa 2007. Ha! Started riding before that board though. It was tricky to find a board to fit my feet back then and I also had an industry discount with Burton at the time. Had to take about a 3 year hiatus to heal some MTB and various other injuries/ailments. But been back riding 4 years now.
I'd definitely recommend measuring your feet. It's free, and can be really illuminating. What size shoe you wear does not correlate to a boot size, but your barefoot measurements do. I'd bet you're not a 12/13 but more like an 11/11.5 in snowboarding boots.
 

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I'd definitely recommend measuring your feet. It's free, and can be really illuminating. What size shoe you wear does not correlate to a boot size, but your barefoot measurements do. I'd bet you're not a 12/13 but more like an 11/11.5 in snowboarding boots.
Second this, I usually am a 45/46 EU in normal shoes depending on manufacturer. Riding a 43.5 EU Burton boot...

recommend to go with mondo sizing which should give you a much better indication.
 

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I'd definitely recommend measuring your feet. It's free, and can be really illuminating. What size shoe you wear does not correlate to a boot size, but your barefoot measurements do. I'd bet you're not a 12/13 but more like an 11/11.5 in snowboarding boots.
Thanks, I'll do that.
 

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@bigwaved You don’t need to read all two thousand posts (?!?!) in this thread, but skim a few pages to see that a) wired sports knows their shit and b) everyone sizes their boots too big, initially. Then post your foot measurements and they will help you to see a brighter future.

 

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I think people forget that the scale goes:
Beginner, intermediate, advanced, expert, pro, godlike.

I'd say there are atleast 3 categories of intermediates: those that just got there, those that are working on technique, those that are almost at the advanced level but have a few things they need to sort out with technique when the terrain gets challenging. I'd say advanced riders can ride almost all of the resort within their comfort zone with good technique. I wouldn't call someone that can get down a black run 'advanced' though it might be to the average person.

Carving is a skillset like anything else. People can be half decent freeriders that can ride an edge and not be into 'carving'. You can leave thin lines in the snow without having your hips almost touching the snow.

It's easy to forget that most of the people on this forum aren't the average snowboarder you see on the hill that get out for maybe a week a year, if that.
Few problems at play here:

The population skill curve is exponential. Modesty aside, I'm probably something like 99th percentile rider. But I don't think I'm shit because the bulk of the bell curve is heelside hero-ing down steeps and back foot steering. I've seen 99.5th percentile riders, who beast me, and the 99.9th percentile riders who beast them. Most disciplines are like this. Me being a 99th percentile rider is the equivalent of being a guy who can have a good run at the local pickup basketball game.

Different skill groups don't interact that much, so people don't have a good way of benchmarking themselves. I'm convinced most "advanced" riders are really intermediates. I certainly was from maybe years 3-5 of riding... I thought I was advanced because I could heelslip down double blacks and ride fast in a straight line. But I was breaking at the waist, not bending my knees enough, and had generally crap fundamentals. But I was WAY better than all of my riding buddies, and rarely saw or rode with anyone who was better than I was. I rode with a buddy who's been riding about 4 years this past weekend, and saw the same thing. He's MUCH better than his crew of friends, but MUCH worse than I am, and he didn't really realize how much he had to work on until I pointed it out to him (both through demonstration and through correcting his form).

People benchmark themselves against what terrain they can hit, not what they can do. You see people all the time say "I am comfortable on blues and can hit most blacks." What the hell does that mean? I'm way more impressed by the guy who can flow through an efficient dynamic carved edge on a mellow blue than the bozo riding fall line on a groomed black with sporadic speed checks. I've been both riders and the former is MUCH harder, both in terms of skill and physicality.
 

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People benchmark themselves against what terrain they can hit, not what they can do. You see people all the time say "I am comfortable on blues and can hit most blacks." What the hell does that mean? I'm way more impressed by the guy who can flow through an efficient dynamic carved edge on a mellow blue than the bozo riding fall line on a groomed black with sporadic speed checks. I've been both riders and the former is MUCH harder, both in terms of skill and physicality.
100% agree. Your whole sentiment, really lol. But yeah, def.
 

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Few problems at play here:

The population skill curve is exponential. Modesty aside, I'm probably something like 99th percentile rider. But I don't think I'm shit because the bulk of the bell curve is heelside hero-ing down steeps and back foot steering. I've seen 99.5th percentile riders, who beast me, and the 99.9th percentile riders who beast them. Most disciplines are like this. Me being a 99th percentile rider is the equivalent of being a guy who can have a good run at the local pickup basketball game.

Different skill groups don't interact that much, so people don't have a good way of benchmarking themselves. I'm convinced most "advanced" riders are really intermediates. I certainly was from maybe years 3-5 of riding... I thought I was advanced because I could heelslip down double blacks and ride fast in a straight line. But I was breaking at the waist, not bending my knees enough, and had generally crap fundamentals. But I was WAY better than all of my riding buddies, and rarely saw or rode with anyone who was better than I was. I rode with a buddy who's been riding about 4 years this past weekend, and saw the same thing. He's MUCH better than his crew of friends, but MUCH worse than I am, and he didn't really realize how much he had to work on until I pointed it out to him (both through demonstration and through correcting his form).

People benchmark themselves against what terrain they can hit, not what they can do. You see people all the time say "I am comfortable on blues and can hit most blacks." What the hell does that mean? I'm way more impressed by the guy who can flow through an efficient dynamic carved edge on a mellow blue than the bozo riding fall line on a groomed black with sporadic speed checks. I've been both riders and the former is MUCH harder, both in terms of skill and physicality.
This is what I was trying to get at with my intermediate split re: comfort with terrain and good technique on said terrain. Those are not the same thing at all!

That said, this breakdown is always a funny thing. I compare it to bike racing where I would beat people in races who I couldnt even keep up with on a group ride.

Different skills at play.

The "are you intermediate if you can't carve" comment just came off as a bit funny to me because that's a skillet that people perfect on wide open blue runs. Others would wonder how that would translate to skinny new England steeps.

Totally different skillsets, even on the same board.

I just see that this kind of thinking is kind of challenging. I might have 80-100 days on the hill but that didn't make me an expert. That's in 3 years for me, but if someone else comes in saying they've been riding for 10 years.... Well that could mean just about anything.
 

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I just see that this kind of thinking is kind of challenging. I might have 80-100 days on the hill but that didn't make me an expert. That's in 3 years for me, but if someone else comes in saying they've been riding for 10 years.... Well that could mean just about anything.
I have about 13 years of riding behind me, but I'd still rate myself as a solid intermediate at best. I don't have the "just huck it" instinct, so I'm not constantly pushing my limits. OTOH, I've only had one snowboarding-related injury of any consequence, and I got it getting off the lift.

I'm more interested in going down blues with good technique and in good control than in finding out if I can hit warp factor one going down a black. And I'm having fun, so what the hell.
 

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Hello all, I really enjoyed reading through this forum and learning about all your Korua experiences/opinions. I had a demo season pass last year and got to try a few different Korua's

Dart 156/160
TF 157
Cafe Racer 156 (own)

My wife fell in love with the Cafe Racer so I got that for her and sometimes steal it and ride it myself. I really enjoy aggressive carving and love the way Korua boards ride but I'd describe myself as an All Mountain freestyle freeriding carver (if that's a thing) basically I enjoy a little bit of everything but my freestyle is mostly on mountain and I don't go into park often. I'm quite convinced I'll love the Otto because I really enjoyed the TF but felt like a little more tail would be prefect for my everyday go to.

My actual question is Korua + series vs regular? I'm pretty set on the Otto and thought I'd just invest in the + to get the best but I became aware of people saying its got more carbon so its not as damp and so on. What are your experience with + vs regular series without considering price, which is better?
 

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People who don’t know any better consider themselves intermediate because they don’t know what they can’t do. People who do know better consider themselves intermediate because they know what they can’t do. It ends up being like 80% of the curve, minus the very bottom and very top.
I got called an advanced rider when I took lessons at jay peak and it just about made my trip.

Still consider myself on the stiffer side of intermediate though. 😂 😂 😂
 

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Hello all, I really enjoyed reading through this forum and learning about all your Korua experiences/opinions. I had a demo season pass last year and got to try a few different Korua's

Dart 156/160
TF 157
Cafe Racer 156 (own)

My wife fell in love with the Cafe Racer so I got that for her and sometimes steal it and ride it myself. I really enjoy aggressive carving and love the way Korua boards ride but I'd describe myself as an All Mountain freestyle freeriding carver (if that's a thing) basically I enjoy a little bit of everything but my freestyle is mostly on mountain and I don't go into park often. I'm quite convinced I'll love the Otto because I really enjoyed the TF but felt like a little more tail would be prefect for my everyday go to.

My actual question is Korua + series vs regular? I'm pretty set on the Otto and thought I'd just invest in the + to get the best but I became aware of people saying its got more carbon so its not as damp and so on. What are your experience with + vs regular series without considering price, which is better?
I have TF plus and tested Otto plus, carbon boards as plus are not exactly damp and are more rigid than fibreglass boards. Carbon board would be about 700 grams lighter than the same board with trad glass.
 

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My actual question is Korua + series vs regular? I'm pretty set on the Otto and thought I'd just invest in the + to get the best but I became aware of people saying its got more carbon so its not as damp and so on. What are your experience with + vs regular series without considering price, which is better?
Used to have the 57 TF+, and owned a number of the og line in the last few szns (currently 59 Pencil, which I love dearly lol). And I'd say the main diff is the + line is relatively more energetic & poppy, while the og line are much more damp and better at busting through messy conditions. Plus line is optimal in perfect/hero snow, before everything gets beat up. In any case, both are best in softer conditions.

But yeah, just depends what matters more to you. Both fun in their own right.
 

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I got called an advanced rider when I took lessons at jay peak and it just about made my trip.

Still consider myself on the stiffer side of intermediate though. 😂 😂 😂
Lol! Same thing happened to me at Kirkwood. I’m sure I strutted around the lodge until I remembered their definition of “intermediate” is someone who can link turns 😂😂
 

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Lol! Same thing happened to me at Kirkwood. I’m sure I strutted around the lodge until I remembered their definition of “intermediate” is someone who can link turns 😂😂
Lol don't get too uppidy. Like we've discussed before, the Tahoe standard for "intermediate" is pretty sad lol.

Remember "advanced / expert" is unbelievably open-ended... by far the widest range. Most would call me an "expert" and I've been one for at least 8-9 years. But I'm a MUCH better rider than when I first crossed that threshold and even now I don't think I'm anything especially impressive. The difference between me and a top pro rider isn't that much in terms of bell curve distribution sense-- I'm maybe 99th percentile, they're probably 99.99th percentile --but in absolute skill terms, the difference between them and me is like the difference between me and the median Tahoe schmuck slipsliding turns. Again, being an "expert" 99th percentile rider makes me the equivalent of the guy who runs shit down at the local pick-up basketball game who would get smoked by the 11th man riding the bench guy on the worst team in the NBA.
 

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Lol don't get too uppidy. Like we've discussed before, the Tahoe standard for "intermediate" is pretty sad lol.

Remember "advanced / expert" is unbelievably open-ended... by far the widest range. Most would call me an "expert" and I've been one for at least 8-9 years. But I'm a MUCH better rider than when I first crossed that threshold and even now I don't think I'm anything especially impressive. The difference between me and a top pro rider isn't that much in terms of bell curve distribution sense-- I'm maybe 99th percentile, they're probably 99.99th percentile --but in absolute skill terms, the difference between them and me is like the difference between me and the median Tahoe schmuck slipsliding turns. Again, being an "expert" 99th percentile rider makes me the equivalent of the guy who runs shit down at the local pick-up basketball game who would get smoked by the 11th man riding the bench guy on the worst team in the NBA.

I think part of this is also based on the terrain you have access to and the terrain you seek but also based on who you ride with. If you're with someone at your skill level then you feel like you're rocking it. Ride with someone who's just that little bit better than you and you're always seeking improvement by learning how you can refine things.

Honestly that's true with anything though... there's just about always someone better at some part of what you're doing and you can always learn. Which is why it's fun!

There's also the entire thing about humility and imposter syndrome where it's like "wow, I'm clearly not good enough to be an expert because xyz is better than me" but like... XYZ person you ride with from time to time is also solidly an expert and just does a few things better than you.

Feel me?

Regarding your BBall analogy, that's always going to be that divide though. There are very few amateurs (wc?) who are better than pros. They can be damn good compared to everyone else, but there's a certain level of prowess that comes with dedicating yourself to something pretty much full time.
 

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Ride with someone who's just that little bit better than you and you're always seeking improvement by learning how you can refine things.
This is a big thing I feel I'm missing. I ride almost exclusively with skiers, and the couple friends I have who board are noobs. If I did ride with someone better than me he'd probably throw me off the lift after my 100th technique question lol.
 
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