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Picked up my 2005 Honda CR-V SE with 69,000 miles on it, it now has 116,000 on it, and countless trips from Long Island to VT without a single hiccup, great car in the snow.

With the racks on top I can easily fit four adults with room for gear and clothes in the back for 3-4 day trips.

Car will last way past 200,000 miles no problem, one of the best snow vehicles you can buy for the money.

Only complaints are its slow AF and the mpg could be better considering the lack of power.

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Thinking about getting a Nissan NV to convert to a camper, but not sure about the rear wheel drive trying to get to the mountains?

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Thinking about getting a Nissan NV to convert to a camper, but not sure about the rear wheel drive trying to get to the mountains?

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
I'm biased and prefer 2 wheel rwd to fwd...and in many cases even to 4wd. Grew up with rwd and learned how to drive in muddy cattle feedlots. In many cases 2 wheel rwd drive is just as effective and will keep you out of trouble (due to being over confidence) when compared to 4wd. Fwd works ok for level ground, but for going up and down, there is a more narrow window. Meaning on Fwd, going up hill, if you have to stop, it harder to get going again...and going down hill, if you have to stop, there is a tendency for your rear end to break loose and swing around...(which is also the case for rwd...but you can goose it or drop down to a lower gear and get the ass end to drag or do a power-slide...hope that makes sense). 4wd is great and works on the same principles as 2 wheel rear drive. The only advantage is that you can get some driving bite with the front tires instead of being pushed by 2 rear wd. The disadvantage is the cost and maintenance, sometimes weight of 4wd (more weight/mass to stop) and more often than not...one becomes over confidence and thus gets in to trouble more quickly. There are 3 main things to be aware of that will result in very effective winter driving to/from the mtns with 2 rear wheel drive.

1 skills and judgement...which mainly consist of driving within the limits of the snow/ice road conditions. Having good judgement, leaving plenty of space between cars (going both up and down) and patience/take your time. The secret is keep going...even just barely rolling (don't spin your tires...feather your gas pedal), that way you maintain steering control and your momentum (going up hill). Don't lock up the brakes/wheels (= no control)...instead use the drag on the engine. Best control is to have a manual transmission and if you have automatic transmission...use the gears. On AT use 2nd gear for going up and going down, use a lower gear so that you can maintain engine drag instead of using your brakes. In essence drive with your gas pedal and gears...and avoid using your brakes.

2 weight, distribute the weight evenly and some weight over your rear wheels.

3 snowtires and a set of chains for the rear...have good snow tires on all 4 tires and a set of chains for the rear. I've only put on the chains like 4 times (for only about the last 5 miles up the hill) in 18 years.

Btw just a dad that has taught my kids to drive up/down Baker, so that I can nap to and from the hill. My technique was driving them up and down the hill for years. Then would be fully awake the first time they drove up and down the hill. The second time they drove..."I'm taking a nap...get me to the hill/home in one piece...I have every confidence you can do it." That first drive often took a long time...resulting in a long refreshing nap...LoL.

edit: Get real chains, don't use the wimpy ass cables or new socks. I use the "Alpine Premier" from Les Schwab. Then drive sensibly, i.e., slow, and don't spin the wheels nor lock them up and chains will last you decades. And if you can't get through with rwd and chains, ya probably shouldn't be going. The gnarls is 4wd with chains on all 4 (which I've done when snowplowing county roads)...not many folks do that but there is not much advantage in actuality...and your better judgement should have over-ridden this option.
 

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I'm biased and prefer 2 wheel rwd to fwd...and in many cases even to 4wd. Grew up with rwd and learned how to drive in muddy cattle feedlots. In many cases 2 wheel rwd drive is just as effective and will keep you out of trouble (due to being over confidence) when compared to 4wd. Fwd works ok for level ground, but for going up and down, there is a more narrow window. Meaning on Fwd, going up hill, if you have to stop, it harder to get going again...and going down hill, if you have to stop, there is a tendency for your rear end to break loose and swing around...(which is also the case for rwd...but you can goose it or drop down to a lower gear and get the ass end to drag or do a power-slide...hope that makes sense). 4wd is great and works on the same principles as 2 wheel rear drive. The only advantage is that you can get some driving bite with the front tires instead of being pushed by 2 rear wd. The disadvantage is the cost and maintenance, sometimes weight of 4wd (more weight/mass to stop) and more often than not...one becomes over confidence and thus gets in to trouble more quickly. There are 3 main things to be aware of that will result in very effective winter driving to/from the mtns with 2 rear wheel drive.

1 skills and judgement...which mainly consist of driving within the limits of the snow/ice road conditions. Having good judgement, leaving plenty of space between cars (going both up and down) and patience/take your time. The secret is keep going...even just barely rolling (don't spin your tires...feather your gas pedal), that way you maintain steering control and your momentum (going up hill). Don't lock up the brakes/wheels (= no control)...instead use the drag on the engine. Best control is to have a manual transmission and if you have automatic transmission...use the gears. On AT use 2nd gear for going up and going down, use a lower gear so that you can maintain engine drag instead of using your brakes. In essence drive with your gas pedal and gears...and avoid using your brakes.

2 weight, distribute the weight evenly and some weight over your rear wheels.

3 snowtires and a set of chains for the rear...have good snow tires on all 4 tires and a set of chains for the rear. I've only put on the chains like 4 times (for only about the last 5 miles up the hill) in 18 years.

Btw just a dad that has taught my kids to drive up/down Baker, so that I can nap to and from the hill. My technique was driving them up and down the hill for years. Then would be fully awake the first time they drove up and down the hill. The second time they drove..."I'm taking a nap...get me to the hill/home in one piece...I have every confidence you can do it." That first drive often took a long time...resulting in a long refreshing nap...LoL.

edit: Get real chains, don't use the wimpy ass cables or new socks. I use the "Alpine Premier" from Les Schwab. Then drive sensibly, i.e., slow, and don't spin the wheels nor lock them up and chains will last you decades. And if you can't get through with rwd and chains, ya probably shouldn't be going. The gnarls is 4wd with chains on all 4 (which I've done when snowplowing county roads)...not many folks do that but there is not much advantage in actuality...and your better judgement should have over-ridden this option.
Yeah, I'm pretty familiar with rwd in snowy conditions, just not on that big of a rig. Also have never driven with chains, so don't know how much they help? Assuming by snow tires you mean studs?

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There is no chance a rwd vehicle is better than a fwd in the snowy mountains on the same tire,you can have your preference but a fwd will always be the best choice outside of awd
 

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Yeah, I'm pretty familiar with rwd in snowy conditions, just not on that big of a rig. Also have never driven with chains, so don't know how much they help? Assuming by snow tires you mean studs?

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Chains are amazing when climbing on snow and ice. You just need to go really slow, speed depends on the type of chains.

At our local mountain the worst days (best snow days?) are 4WD+chains only.
 
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