Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

21 - 40 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I just got finished scraping one of my boards and have the same white spots. I've scraped so much and there is barely any wax coming off. Also, there appears to be black specks coming off so I stopped scraping. Seeing others saying it will come off after a couple runs is reassuring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Just got finished scraping my other board and noticed it was much easier to scrape and I don't have the white spots. That being said, my older board (the one with the white spots after scraping) is an extruded base and my new board (no white spots after scraping) is a sintered base.

I know these bases soak in different amounts of wax, does that make a difference in the amount of scraping needed? BTW, both board received approximately the same amount of drip wax. (Don't mean to hijack the thread; thought this would help the OP since I was dealing with the same issues)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
That looks like a good one for what I want to do.
Do you use this or have you seen it used?
Would it get rid of the white on my board and should I even care (about a little remaining wax) ?

Thanx
I use a nylon roto brush, but not that one. I use a different one (toko brand) they used to sell.

Keep scraping, then you use the nylon rotobrush to clear out the base structure and polish. If you need to use the shorter edge of the scraper, use it. Rotobrushes don't perform miracles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
A nice looking bottom...that you don't even see...I'm guessing that you have more than OCD.

Tip about plastic scrapers; presuming that you have already sharpened your metal edges of the board, as you are scraping the wax, every few swipes, just take the plastic edge and scrape the plastic edge perpendicular on your board's metal edge. This will just shave a tad off the plastic edge of the scraper to keep it sharp. No reason to stop and file the plastic edge down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
I'm guessing that you have more than OCD.
Fair enough. But pointing that out to the internet, thus attempting to humiliate a stranger and newcomer to a forum says what about you?
Self-deprecating humor or a comment like that from a friend is one thing, what you did is something altogether different.

To everyone else that gave their input. Thank you! After years of not caring much about waxing my board, I've finally taken an interest to care more.
And the takeaway is my result is fine. If I figure out how to finish a board lookin as good as a shop does, great. If not, that's cool too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Fair enough. But pointing that out to the internet, thus attempting to humiliate a stranger and newcomer to a forum says what about you?
Self-deprecating humor or a comment like that from a friend is one thing, what you did is something altogether different.

To everyone else that gave their input. Thank you! After years of not caring much about waxing my board, I've finally taken an interest to care more.
And the takeaway is my result is fine. If I figure out how to finish a board lookin as good as a shop does, great. If not, that's cool too.
Apologies, no offense or humiliation intended, was just giving some shit. Figured with an alpine background, you'd have all the wax and tuning stuff down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Apologies, no offense or humiliation intended, was just giving some shit. Figured with an alpine background, you'd have all the wax and tuning stuff down.
Except for the title of my thread "I'm terrible at waxing" I can see how you drew your conclusion. Now I gave you some shit, lol. NP, all good.👌😃
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
That wax isn't going to hurt anything, if you want to go faster it's on you to improve your form. Not saying you have bad form just saying that reducing drag is the best way to get faster. The air resistance of a rogue hand or sticking out butt, or micro speed checks, far exceeds that of a bit of wax over snow. My guess is if you were to trade boards with your buddy he'd still be faster.

I will say I think the wax is originating from the tip of the board and working it's way down, which is natural. Concentrate a little more on the tip where it curves. It's easy to neglect scraping there as well because of the shape and lack of leverage as the board flexes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,253 Posts
Plastic scrapers are pretty lame. Get a metal scraper, dull the 4 corners and try to wax with the least amount of wax you need to get full coverage. Then scrape as much wax as you can from the surface... if you want, get a cheap brillo pad and take a bit more wax away after you have scraped. Any effect from a bad scrape should be gone by your 2nd run at most.... so even if you do a shitty scrape, it won't stay terrible for a whole day.

I hate waxing and scraping, but I love a freshly waxed board. If it was a 0 effort thing, I would definitely wax before each day.... but because it's a hassle, I wax every once in a while but at least aim for a reasonably fresh waxed board before solid pow days or a trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Are you scraping excess wax off before laying down new wax? That may account for buildup in spots.
No. I plan to next time though. I doubt it will give me a shiny black bottom though. I scraped until there was barely any yield, can't imagine a lot coming more coming off. Plus the previous wax/scrape was done by a shop and looked great so I doubt there was much build up before I applied wax.

I just finished my first two days of riding of the season and my board felt plenty slick and felt the same as when I get it from a shop so I think whatever I did was good enough.
I was noticing the bottoms of people's boards plenty of them had the same amount of white stuff I did those were probably the homemade wax jobs. As I stated before based on the responses on this thread I'm thinking it just doesn't matter much and I'm pretty much over it. On the small chance it's my wax which is very old I was going to buy new wax cuz all use it anyway. When I'm in a shop and there waxing I'll try to watch and see what they do and see the result but other than that I'm done trying to get any better.

Here's a pic of my board after riding. Pretty much looked the same, maybe slightly less then when I started;
151378
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Tap the wax for a second on the iron base and then chalk/wipe/rub it over the base. Do this repeatedly. This will leave a thin smear of wax over the base before ironing in, leaving the maximum coverage with the least amount of waste.

Then get a SHARP scraper. This is the most important thing. You need to sharpen after each board you do as perspex will dull on the scraping edge. I put my 5mm scraper in a woodworking vice and file the edge with a medium file. This is quick. You want to have a crisp 90 degree edge on the scraper. A sharp scraper gives the quickest easiest way to take excess wax off.

I have a 300x120mm firm scotch pad that is on a handled grip that takes all the loose wax off after scraper.

Next hit it with a 300mm rotor brush. They are a little $$$ to initially set up but it's the best money you can spend for tuning.

Then finish off with a horse hair brush to polish up base. Looks brilliant when finished.

Another really important thing is to have a decent work station set up ie vices. I have a waxing station as well as a scraping set up which I do outside so any wax debris just goes on grass (No clean up). Buy good tools ie Toko, Swix, Diaface etc) They will last a long time.

I started about a decade a go doing this for my own gear and now do about 50 customers as a small business on the side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
If it's still white after a couple runs, it's not even touching the snow.
That's how it looked when I was heading home as well.

I got a lot of good advice from everybody. If I still cared about producing a fully black, glossy bottom, I'd follow Craig51's advice as well as a lot of other tips in this thread. But the boards performed well and not one respondent said that white will slow me down and most said it didn't matter.

I will buy some new wax that I've seen recommended on here, maybe a tool or two and I'll try and use less wax (I'll try Craig51's tip about smearing before ironing) but I'm no longer fixated on getting a perfect result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
This season I've been cleaning my base with dish soap, water, and a scotch-brite sponge before waxing. I've never used base cleaner before because I'm sketched out by the solvents.

Cleaning the base this way stripped more wax than I was expecting. I usually do hot scrapes, and I felt like this cleaning was more effective. My bases were chalky for sure.

I've been waxing way less often. It's been six or seven days on one of my decks, and it looks like one or two. I think the wax penetrated deeper into the base without old wax in the way, and it bonded to the base better.

I've also been using cold weather wax along the edges where the wax gets rubbed off the fastest. This isn't new for this season though. I also like to keep the iron as cool as I can, and avoid heating the base as much as possible. I don't think the wax needs heat beyond the melting point to melt into the base. Extra heat can't be good for a core formed under heat and pressure, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
This season I've been cleaning my base with dish soap, water, and a scotch-brite sponge before waxing. I've never used base cleaner before because I'm sketched out by the solvents.
Cleaning the base this way stripped more wax than I was expecting.
Thanks. l'll try this before I wax again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
This has been beat to death, but I have too much waxing experience as both my kids raced for six years and I had to endlessly wax their skis. I had to do their race skis perfectly, especially since they used them just for two runs, but their training skis and my snowboards I eventually optimized down to a half-assed wax job that still works fine.

As others have said, sharpen your plastic scraper with sandpaper everytime you wax. They literally go blunt from one good scraping.

It's also fine to leave some wax on the base. It turns out snow is really good at scraping off excess wax! I just lightly scrape my snowboards and after two runs the base looks like I brushed and rubbed it like I do my kids' race skis. There is no noticeable performance impact during those runs. The key is getting wax into the pores of the base, where it extrudes over time. Extra wax residue disappears almost immediately.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
803 Posts
I think it's entirely possible the white is because your iron isn't hot enough and the wax is cooling before it has a chance to be absorbed by the base.

The recommended temperature for the iron is on the box the wax came in. Make sure you don't mix up Fahrenheit and Celsius, but other than that it's unlikely you're going to have the iron hot enough to damage the base.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
It turns out snow is really good at scraping off excess wax!
The key is Extra wax residue disappears almost immediately.
I believe you, others have said the same thing in this thread. The curiosity is why is the white stuff still on my board (thanx to drblast for your thoughts) After 6 runs.jpg This pic is after 5 - 6 runs and pretty much looked like that at the end of 1.5 days on the hill. As I've stated, I'm over caring about a board devoid of excess wax. I'm ready to let the thread go off into the sunset, yet it lives on somehow, lol.
151428
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
Top